Let’s Get Cooking – Bali: Mushroom Filled Tempeh-Potato Patties with Lemon Aïoli

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As a great appetizer or a vegetarian main dish, these patties are high in protein – and tasty.  Plus you can vary the taste by your choice of mushroom. And you can choose just to make the mushroom sauce and lemon aïoli if you have prepared veggie patties.

Makes: 30 small patties or 8 big ones.

Ingredients:

  • 1 recipe of Tempe Potato Patties uncooked (http://baliadvertiser.biz/potato/) – see below or  buy prepared tempeh patties from you local health food market
  • 1/2 cup chopped fresh dill

Ingredients for the mushroom filling:

  • 1 Tbl. olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • 4 shallots, thinly sliced
  • 100 g. (3/4 cup) fresh shitake mushrooms, cleaned and chopped
  • 200 g  ( 1  1/2 cups)fresh portobello mushrooms, cleaned and chopped
  • 1 Tbl. crumbled dried thyme leaves
  • 1 tsp. lemon juice
  • salt and pepper – to taste

Ingredients for the Lemon Aïoli

  • 4 hard-cooked egg yolks, save the whites for another use
  • 3 Tbl lemon or lime juice
  • 1/4 tsp. sugar
  • 1/4 tsp. freshly ground pepper
  • 1/2 tsp. sea salt
  • 2 pinches of ground cayenne
  • 2 tsp. Dijon mustard
  • 1 tsp. lemon zest, finely grated
  • 1 small clove of garlic, pressed
  • 5 Tbl. extra virgin olive oil

Directions:

Make the recipe for Tempe Potato Patties up to the point where you form the patties or – as I would do – open up your Life Foods veggie patties.

If you love cooking, you can make your own patties:

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Tempeh patties

Tempe Potato Patties from http://baliadvertiser.biz/potato/
Serves 4

Ingredients for Potatoes :
– 350 gr. (about 1.4 cups or 12.34 ounces) potatoes
– ½ tsp. salt
– ¼ tsp. cumin powder
– ¼ tsp. coriander powder
– 1/8 tsp. cayenne or red chili powder
– 1 clove garlic, pressed
– 2 Tbl. celery leaves finely chopped
– pepper to taste

Ingredients for Tempe :
– 100 gr. (3/4 cup or 3.53 ounces) tempe
– 1/8 tsp. salt
– 1/8 tsp. cumin powder
– 1/8 tsp. coriander powder
– cayenne or red chili powder to taste
– pepper to taste
– 1 egg beaten in a small bowl
– ¾ cup bread crumbs on a small plate
– Canola oil for frying

Directions:

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Boiled potatoes

Boil the potatoes in their skins until soft. Set aside until cool enough to handle and then remove the skins. Mash the potatoes with a potato masher. Once they are evenly mashed add the salt, cumin, coriander, chili powder, celery leaves, and pepper. Mix well. Set this aside.

Boil the tempeh for about 10 minutes or until done. Mash the tempeh. Add the salt, cumin, coriander, chili powder, and pepper. When this is well mixed add the potato mixture and mix very well. Adjust the seasoning to taste. Make patties about 6 cm in diameter and 2 cm thick from this mixture. You should have about 8-9 patties.

Or – if you don’t have time or the passion for cooking, buy quality veggie patties such as those from Life Foods:

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or

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Life Foods has other great veggie choices

http://www.lifefoodsinc.com/

Whatever your choice, cook the patties:

Heat about 1 Tbl. canola oil in a non-stick frying pan big enough to hold all the patties in one layer. (You can also do this in two batches – it is important that they are in one layer.) While the oil heats, take a patty and dip it in the beaten egg and then in the bread crumbs, coating both sides of the patty. Do this with the remaining patties. Fry the patties until golden brown and then flip them over and brown the other side, adding oil as needed. These are most delicious when well browned and served warm.

Set this aside.

Make the mushroom filling by heating 1 Tbl. olive oil in a frying pan.  When the oil is hot add the garlic and shallots, stir frying until the shallots are limp.  Crumble in the dried thyme leaves, giving it a good stir and then add the shitake and Portobello mushrooms.  Stir fry these over a high heat until they start to brown and release their juices.  Season with lemon juice, salt and pepper and continue stir frying until most of the juice evaporates.  Remove from the heat and set aside.

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Sauté the mushrooms until most of the liquid is gone.

If you are making appetizers, take a spoonful of the Tempe Potato Patty dough and flatten into a 5 cm disk.  Make another one the same size.  Put 1 tsp.of the mushroom filling on a disk and top with a sprig of dill.  Take another disk and lay on top of the mushroom filling, pushing down to flatten and pinching the sides closed.  Continue like this until you have used all the tempe potato dough and the sautéed mushrooms.  You should have about 30 small filled patties.

If you want to eat this as a vegetarian main course make the patties bigger and fill with a larger amount of sautéed  mushrooms.  You should have about 8 large filled patties.

Keep the patties warm in the oven until ready to serve.

As you are cooking the patties, make the lemon aïoli.

Put all the ingredients for the lemon aïoli, except the oil, in blender, food processor, stick blender container or a deep mortar with a pestle.  Combine the ingredients until smooth. Slowly add the oil while continuing to mix.  Taste and correct for salt, pepper and lemon juice.

You can either drizzle the sauce over the patties or serve it in a bowl for each diner to dip into.

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Bon Appetit!

Recipe by Ayu Spicy in “Food Glorious Food” from Bali Advertiser, 14-28 Sept. 2016, p. 44

http://baliadvertiser.biz/mushroom-filled-tempe-potato-patties-with-lemon-aioli/

Enjoy – and as they say in Bali, “Selamat makan,”  Renée

Images from: <http://www.justpaleofood.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/garlic-roasted-sauteed-mushrooms.jpg&gt;; <http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-J3C2dwY3n0w/R5EQPDZomwI/AAAAAAAABeg/2t44EYXSWeg/s640/tempeh2.jpg&gt;; <http://www.epicurus.com/food/recipes/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/AddHerbs.png&gt;; <https://thumbs.dreamstime.com/m/boiled-potatoes-their-skins-raw-parsley-39400568.jpg&gt;

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kiawe? That thorny tree a super-food?

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A beautiful kiawe bean – bright, no marks, sweet, nutrient rich, diabetic friendly.

On Maui, we enjoy many blessings: the Hawaiian culture of aloha and chant, beautiful beaches, volcanoes, rain forests, temperate weather, splendid sunrises and sunsets, outrigger canoe paddling, . . . a vacation paradise. However, we import about 90% of our food and fuel. In the middle of the Pacific Ocean – 2,336 miles from San Francisco and about 4,034 miles from Tokyo – we are very food and energy insecure.

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Ocean as far as we can see.

This is a fact of concern.

However, most of us in Hawaii have been over-looking a terrific food source – a much-maligned tree that will give you a painful puncture wound if you step on its thorn. Its beans have been used as cattle and pig fodder or for firewood (mesquite). Tough and hearty – often looking like dead, brown trees during dry conditions, but quickly becoming green with new growth after a rain, kiawe trees are on all the leeward coasts of the Hawaiian islands.

A recent workshop shared that the kiawe beans – from that non-native, drought and salt resistant invasive tree – is actually a local super food. Wild-food guru Sunny Savage says, “Millions of pounds of kiawe beans are just falling to the ground every year, completely and utterly unloved. This tree of life can produce up to 6 harvests per year” (Wild Food Plants of Hawaii, 111).

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Naturally sweet, bubbling kiawe tea

We don’t need to be food insecure in Hawaii if we learn how to hunt (not hard in Kihei and other dry areas in Hawaii), gather, sort, clean, dry, make flour, and create from recipes using kiawe bean pods.

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Tasha making ‘aina bars

Sunny Savage and Vince Dodge presented our Kiawe 101 hands-on Workshop in Kihei, Maui.   Vince, of Wai’anae Gold, mills kiawe beans into flour and makes delicious products such as ‘aina bars, a raw power bar from kiawe flour.

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Kiawe trees grow on the dry leeward coasts of the Hawaiian islands

Vince and Sunny told us that kiawe (aka mesquite /algarrobo), was introduced in 1826, by a French Jesuit priest who had stopped in Peru for a while on his way to Hawaii. Father Alexis Bachelot was impressed by the uses the Peruvians made of the tree and brought it here. A memorial plaque at the old Catholic Mission on Fort Street in Honolulu commemorates that very first tree; its stump is still there today.

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Vince and Sunny at the Kiawe 101 Workshop

In Hawaii, the seedpods became animal fodder and firewood but was not eaten by the people. In contrast, in the Americas, the Middle East, India and many other places where the tree is native, the dried pulverized bean pods were a revered staple food. Naturally sweet, nutrient dense and diabetic friendly, kiawe bean pod flour is a Hawaiian Super Food. All our islands are blessed with abundant kiawe forests.

kiawe tea

Kiawe tea in a coconut

Wai’anae Gold is working with families to produce food and create livelihoods for the future. For ten years Wai’anae Gold under the leadership of Vince Dodge has been on this path educating and encouraging  communities to return to the bounty that the `aina has provided for us all.

To see recipes, buy milled kiawe flour and other kiawe products direct, go to the Wai’anae Gold site:< http://waianaegold.com/ >

Vince says, “We are `Ai Pohaku – The Stone Eaters. Come and join us. He ali`i ka `aina. He kauwa ke kanaka. The land is chief, people its servants (`Olelo No`eau 531 Pukui 1983).”

For the workshop, Vince and Sunny shared how to hunt, gather, select, dry, and use kiawe. We got to taste the super sweet (but diabetic friendly) tea, and eat a meal of kiawe and coconut soup, with kiawe cornbread, kiawe tortillas, and to top it off for dessert, kiawe ‘aina bars: delicious, filling and nutritious!!

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Hunting for fallen kiawe beans

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We all loved the kiawe tea

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Sunny making kiawe tortillas

Vince is “The founder of ‘Ai Pohaku, Vince Kana‘i Dodge, is a papa (grandfather), educator, cultural practitioner and longtime resident of Wai‘anae where kiawe trees are plentiful.

He shares the story that one day in early 2006 on MA‘O Organic Farms a couple from Arizona shared that “mesquite” – the cousin of kiawe – was a staple of all the Southwest native peoples.  All those years ago, Gary told Vince that kiawe was a sweet, nutritious and diabetic-friendly food.

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At that time the Wai‘anae community was in the throes of a diabetic epidemic (about one-third of the people in Wai’anae had diabetics, including some as young as 7th grade). Imagine: a sweet, nutritious diabetic-friendly food growing in our backyards… Vince was called. We believe it is no accident that the concentration of kiawe and diabetes are in the same place.”

Last week, Vince was able to meet Gary Paul Nabhan that important visitor from 2006, who was speaking here on Maui for the organic agricultural festival. 🙂

 

Vinceshirt

 

 

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Eugi’s kiawe bean dryer – with Vince and Erika

Sunny Savage is host of the wild food cooking show Hot on the Trail, presenter at the  2014 TedxMaui, a foraging workshop guide, and author of the beautiful and inspiring Wild Food Plants of Hawaii.  To be connected to the land, to absorb important trace minerals and nutrition we aren’t getting from our processed food, Sunny encourages all of us to forage for at least one wild food each day.

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Vince showing us how to sort the kiawe beans

 

Yesterday, my son Johnny and I ran into each other. We had an hour to spare. We each took a bag and in no time walking along the beach under the shade of kiawe trees, we had them filled with bright, plump kiawe pods. Right now they are drying (inside my car with the windows rolled up)! We look forward to making our kiawe flour into pancakes, bread, soup, sparkling drinks . . .

Again this weekend, we have warnings of two hurricanes headed this way. But now besides our cans of beans and bottles of water for emergency use, we have the knowledge of how to sustain ourselves on the humble kiawe bean pods that are all around us.

Johnny aina copy

Johnny making ‘aina bars – 2 parts kiawe flour, 2 parts nut butter, 1 part honey, and a pinch of Hawaiian salt. We are ready for a hurricane!

What overlooked food source do you have nearby?

Nature is bountiful; we just need eyes to see – and people like Sunny and Vince to teach us.

Happy foraging.

Aloha, Renée

 

Quotation: I live my life . . .

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I live my life in widening circles
that reach out across the world.
I may not complete this last one
but I give myself to it.
I circle around God, around the primordial tower.
I’ve been circling for thousands of years
and I still don’t know: am I a falcon,
a storm, or a great song?
Book of Hours, I 2

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Unknown

Rilke

-Rilke translation from Krista Tippett’s interview with Joanna Macy

http://www.onbeing.org/program/wild-love-world/feature/widening-circles/1444

René Karl Wilhelm Johann Josef Maria Rilke —better known as Rainer Maria Rilke —was a Bohemian-Austrian poet and novelist, “widely recognized as one of the most lyrically intense German-language writing in both verse and highly lyrical prose. Several critics have described Rilke’s work as inherently “mystical”.[2][3] His writings include one novel, several collections of poetry, and several volumes of correspondence in which he invokes haunting images that focus on the difficulty of communion with the ineffable in an age of disbelief, solitude, and profound anxiety. These deeply existential themes tend to position him as a transitional figure between the traditional and the modernist writers. <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rainer_Maria_Rilke&gt;
…Wikipedia

Image: <https://search.yahoo.com/yhs/search?p=image+of+a+storm&ei=UTF-8&hspart=mozilla&hsimp=yhs-002&gt;.

<https://search.yahoo.com/yhs/search?p=image+of+a+falcon+in+flight&ei=UTF-8&h>

Aloha, Renée

 

 

 

Thought for the Day: Mean People?

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In Laura Moriarty’s first novel, The Center of Everything, ten-year-old Evelyn always has trouble with her skinny old neighbor.

“My mother says that when Mrs. Rowley is mean, which is generally the case, it is really because she is just unhappy, and who could blame her with a husband like that, and Travis always in so much trouble.  She says this is really the only reason people are ever mean–they have something hurting inside of them, a claw of unhappiness scratching at their hears, and it hurts them so much that sometimes they have to push it right out of their mouths to scratch someone else, just to give themselves a rest, a moment of relief” (60).

Remember this when someone is mean to you – and walk on by.

Aloha, Renée

Barry’s Gleanings: “Economy’s Tragic Mismatch”

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Rich Karlgaard is the publisher at Forbes; his latest book is Team Genius: The New Science of High-Performing Organizations (2015).  In the July 26,2016 Forbes article, “Economy’s Tragic Mismatch” he notes:

“A few weeks ago I spoke to a trade group of construction company CEO and CFOs.  I thought their top concern would be taxes, regulations, the slow-growth economy or, perhaps, the 2016 election.  Wrong.  It was the lack of skilled labor.  . . ”

For the rest of the article, go to <http://www.forbes.com/sites/richkarlgaard/2016/07/06/economys-tragic-mismatch/#1a7732125746>

Good-paying jobs are out there.  Especially if you go to a community college, you can get the needed skills in a relatively short time and for not that much money.  Check out such possibilities.

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Rich Karlgaard

Aloha, Barry & Renée

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Employment up in the U.S. at some good paying jobs

Images from: <https://www.rccc.edu/news/2013/09/17/welder-completes-rowan-cabarrus-training-program-secures-dream-job/&gt; &

<http://www.abc.net.au/news/2012-06-19/a-welder-at-work/4079936&gt;

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Barry’s Gleanings: Your Aching Neck

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Some people complain that in-person relationships are being strained because many people spend much time on their cell phones, iPads, computers, and other such screens.

Here is another reason to limit screen time (or at least do it consciously).

In her August 2016 column, “For Your Health: Text neck troubles,” Jane Langille, reports:

“Dr. Kenneth Hansraj, a Costco member and chief of spine surgery at New York Spine Surgery & Rehabilitation Medicine, in Poughkeepsie, New York, wondered why a 30-year-old male patient still suffered from neck pain long after Hansraj had surgically repaired a herniated disk in his back.  The man was unable to return to work in spite of months of physical therapy.  As a follow-up exam, the source of his pain was crystal clear: He admitted to spending four hours a day playing Angry Birds on his iPad and showed his doctor how he looked down at the screen. . . ”

Click on the link below to see the rest of this article and tips to help prevent “text neck.”

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From page 68 of The Costco Connection, printed page 65: http://www.costcoconnection.com/connection/201608?pg=NaN#pgNaN

 

 

Image from:  https://kimberlyjozwiakblog.files.wordpress.com/2015/02/woman-hunched-over-computer.jpg

Please, sit up, sit up  – bring your devices to eye level – every time.

Be healthy.

Aloha, Barry & Renee

Skeleton image from: <http://svmassagetherapy.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/slumpshoulder.jpg&gt;.

Barry’s Gleanings: Yoga Sutra – #33 for a serene mind

Don't give advice -
http://www.inbali.org/animal-lovers-guide-bali/

“By cultivating attitudes of friendliness toward the happy, compassion for the unhappy, delight in the virtuous, and disregard toward the wicked, the mind retains its undisturbed calmness” – Sutra  [a rule or aphorism in Sanskrit literature] # 33 of Patanjali.

In the commentary on this Sutra, Sri Swami Satchidananda notes, “Whether you are interested in reaching samadhi [a superconscious state] or plan to ignore Yoga entirely, I would advise you to remember at least this one Sutra. It will be very helpful to you in keeping a peaceful mind in your daily life.  . . . try to follow this one  Sutra very well and you will see its efficacy.  . . . This Sutra became my guiding light to keep my mind serene always.” 

Patanjali says that there are four kinds of people: the happy people, unhappy people, the virtuous and the wicked.  “At any given moment, you can fit any person into one of these four categories.

  • A happy person.  Even four thousand years ago there must have been people who were not happy at seeing others happy.  It is still the same way.  Suppose somebody drives up in a big car, parks in front of her huge palatial home and gets out.  Some other people are standing on the pavement in the hot sun getting tired.  How many of those people will be happy?  Not many.  They will be saying, ‘See that big car?  She is sucking the blood of the laborers.’  We come across people like that; they are always jealous.  When a person gets a name, fame or high position, they try to criticize that person. ‘Oh, don’t you know, her brother is so-and-so; she must have pulled some strings somewhere.’  They will never admit that she might have gone up by her own merit.  By that jealousy, you will not disturb her, but you will disturb your own serenity.  She simply got out of the car and walked into the house, but you are burning up inside.  Instead, think, ‘Oh, such a fortunate person.  If everybody were like that how happy the world would be.  May God bless everybody to have such comfort.  I will also get that one day.’  Make that person your friend.  That response is missed in many cases, not only between individuals but even among nations.  When some nation is prospering, the neighboring country is jealous of it and wants to ruin its economy.  So we should always have the key of friendliness when we see happy people.”
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Young and rich – be happy for her.

  • The unhappy person.  “Maybe he is suffering from previous bad karma, but we should have compassion.  If you can lend a helping hand, do it.  If you can share half of your loaf, share it.  Be merciful always.  By doing that, you will retain the peace and poise of your mind.  Remember, our goal is to keep the serenity of our minds.  Whether our mercy is going to help that person or not, by our own feeling of mercy, at least we are helped.”
  • The virtuous person.  “When you see a virtuous man [or woman], feel delighted.  ‘Oh, how great he is.  He must be my hero.  I should imitate his great qualities.’ Don’t envy him; don’t try to pull him down.  Appreciate the virtuous qualities in him and try to cultivate them in your own life.”                                                                                      We would do well to follow these examples:
  • The wicked.  “We come across wicked people sometimes.  We can’t deny that.  So what should be our attitude?  Indifference. ‘Well, some people are like that.   Probably I was like that yesterday.  Am I not a better person now?  She will probably be all right tomorrow.’  Don’t try to advise such people because wicked people seldom take advice. If you try to advise them you will lose your peace.

I still remember a small story from the Pancha Tantra [an ancient Indian collection of interrelated animal fables in verse and prose] which I was told as a small child.

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The Pancha Tantra tales

One rainy day, a monkey was sitting on a tree branch getting completely drenched.  Right opposite on another branch of the same tree there was a small sparrow sitting in its hanging nest.  Normally a sparrow builds its nest on the edge of a branch so it can hang down and swing around gently in the breeze.  It has a nice cabin inside with an upper chamber, a reception room, a bedroom down below and even a delivery room if it is going to give birth to little ones.  Oh yes, you should see and admire a sparrow’s nest sometime.

So, it was warm and cozy inside its nest and the sparrow just peeped out and, seeing the poor monkey, said, ‘Oh, my dear friend, I am so small; I don’t even have hands like you, only a small beak.  But with only that I built a nice house, expecting this rainy day.  Even if the rain continues for days and days, I will be warm inside.  I heard Darwin saying that you are the forefather of the human beings, so why don’t you use your brain?  Build a nice, small hut somewhere to protect yourself during the rain.’

You should have seen the face of that monkey.  It was terrible!  ‘Oh, you little devil!  How dare you try to advise me?  Because you are warm and cozy in your nest you are teasing me.  Wait, you will see where you are!’  The monkey proceeded to tear the nest to pieces, and the poor bird had to fly out and get drenched like the monkey.

This is a story I was told when I was quite young and I still remember it.  Sometimes we come across such monkeys, an if you advise them they take it as an insult.  They think you are proud of your position.  If you sense even a little of that tendency in somebody, stay away.  He or she will have to learn by experience.  By giving advice to such people, you will only lose your peace of mind. . . .

So have these four attitudes: friendliness, compassion, gladness and indifference.  . . . Nothing in the world can upset you then.  Remember, our goal is to keep a serene mind” (p. 54-57).

from: The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali – translation and commentary by Sri Swami Satchidananda

In this time of noisy political rhetoric, we would do well to remember Sutra #33.

Aloha, Renée

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https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=The+Yoga+Sutras+of+Patanjali+

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quotation: Resilient New Realities

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We create transformative, resilient new realities by becoming transformed, resilient people,” says Krista Tippett in her new book – Becoming Wise: An Inquiry into the Mystery and Art of Living.  

https://www.amazon.com/Becoming-Wise-Inquiry-Mystery-Living/dp/1594206805

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The book is inspiring and thought provoking.

Happy reading (and thinking).

Aloha, Renée

Photo:  from a street exhibit in Sydney, Australia

 

 

Monks on a bus and monkeys on the roof

Our Israeli friend Ruthi who we’ve known since teaching in China just went home after a great experience teaching English to monks in Sri Lanka.

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Now I’ve got your attention. This had to be the title for this blog entry, especially after I saw the number of “likes” my monks on a bus photo got on Facebook. Here it is:

monks on a bus Travelling to school

Anyway, how to sum up this crazy experience of a month teaching Buddhist monks in Bhiksu University, Sri Lanka? Was it what we had expected? Of course not! Things never are. On the plane over to Sri Lanka we again looked at each other wondering whether we were totally insane. How bad could it be, we thought? We had spoken via Skype to the Reverend Mediyawe Piyarathana, the English lecturer in charge of the program, and we had been interviewed by Paul Ellmes of http://www.giveafigvolunteering.com, who also lived there in the city, and seemed to be a nice, friendly chap.  Just for a month….. what could go wrong, we thought. Well…

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Postcards from “the field”

Here’s a blog from an anthropologist  who knows Bali well. Thanks, Anne.

Anthropology, Indonesia, Bali : according to Graeme MacRae

Once upon a time anthropology was about what happened in faraway places. The way we found out about those places was by going there and hanging out and keeping our eyes and ears open. This was called “fieldwork” because the “field” we were studying was somewhere else. I’ve never been very comfortable with these words and now that the everything and everybody is moving everywhere I suspect the whole idea of “field(work)” may cause more problems than it is worth.

Nevertheless, all research happens somewhere, and when we are there we may experience everyday life in different ways than when we are “at home”. Sometimes, especially when I’ve just arrived, I write little stories which I send home to students, friends and family. What I think they reflect are a first, existential layer of the ethnographic experience that anthropology gets built out of.

Here are this years crop …

#1…

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