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2019 Women’s March – Maui

We were back at UHMC for the third time – for many of the same issues. Again, the spirit was mainly up-beat with the knowledge that there is much to be done – and we can unite – and we will not wait for others to speak and act for us.

The third Woman’s March – Jan. 19, 2019 at the UHMC campu

Women and men, old and young gathered for a few hours of music, inspiring speakers, socializing, learning about new issues, and just generally being re-inspired to keep working for the values we support.

Nursing professor Kathleen brought her daughter. Paddling sister Gail brought her 90-year-old mother and two sisters from the U.S. Mainland.
Flags and banners added color and declared interests

According to “The Maui News,” about 2,000 people participated in our Women’s March in Kahului. One participant expressed what many felt: “he came out to support women’s rights and to support the planet’s rights and to try to have solidarity with everyone who’s turning to the positive side instead of the negative side” (A 1).

One of our Maui event organizers, Robin Pilus, noted, “At the very beginning, we felt we could make a difference; it seemed like we could sprint, with all that energy. Now we realized it will be a long-distance run.” (A 3).

I thought this sign was from an environmental group – but no. Many signs were fun and funny!

The guy with the bullhorn from last year was back. As we marched off campus, he screamed at us, “You are going to hell!!” One of his signs noted, “Feminism makes women hate men!” Most of us just ignored him since he showed no interest in actually talking with anyone. He might actually want to check his sources. 🙂 Science is good.

Many groups came: Moms Demand Action – for sane gun laws; http://www.KeepYour Power.org – because of carcinogen components involved, this group is against 5G cell antennas and “Smart Meters”; Pro-Choice – for a woman’s rights over her body; LGBT groups for human rights; immigrants – for just treatment; people concerned about the U.S. Navy plans to have training missions in our beautiful waters and near shores; environmental groups – for protection of our marine life and shores. . . .

Other signs said, “Build Houses, Not Walls,” “Compassion for All”. . .

This was on my T-shirt – getting new voters to sign up is what I like to do.

I carried this sign. The back declared, “We Stand Against Oppression! Flo, who I know from water testing and the Humpback Whale Sanctuary, made my sign and others. Mahalo 🙂
Helping and supporting one another is what our community does.

Many people came to the march, and we know that many more were with us in spirit.

We have much hope for the future.

There is much for everyone to do. Let’s keep working. Blessings and hope to you wherever you are.

Aloha, Renée

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U.S. Navy Plans for Special Operations Training in Maui County (and beyond)

The U.S. Navy in its practice for war has a history in Maui County. Among other actions, Navy used our eighth largest Hawaiian island, Kaho’olawe, a place sacred to Hawaiians, for target practice. Starting in 1941. Kaho’olawe was transformed into a bombing range with ship-to-shore bombardment and later with American submarines testing torpedoes by firing them at shoreline cliffs.  They even simulated the blast effects of nuclear weapons on shipboard weapon systems.  Although Kaho’olawe is about six miles from Maui, our island windows shook at the bombing impacts.  During the Navy testing and practice, a few of the torpedoes missed  – and landed on Maui!  

Despite decades of protest, the Navy continued the bombings until 1990! The results: a dead island where although over 9 million tons of debris and un-exploded ordinances have been removed, no one can live, no one can even visit without getting special permission because it is still too dangerous to be there.  I can see Kaho’olawe from the deck of my house. The Navy spent millions to clean it up, but there are still un-exploded Navy bombs there; I’m not likely ever to go there.  

The U.S. Navy has a new plan. According to the January 4, 2019 edition of “The Maui News,” the Navy says, “[T]here will be no live-fire or amphibious assault craft and aircraft landings as part of their proposed exercises around Maui County . . .The Navy is proposing nearshore water training in the county, which will include naval special operation personnel diving and swimming and launching and recovering small vehicles designed to operate underwater” (A 1).

Also, the Navy had said they would accept public comment until today (January 7) – but before the deadline, they announced they had decided to go ahead with their proposals!

What the Navy says in its plan to go ahead with training exercises is much more limited than what it puts forth as possibilities in the four huge volumes of its Hawaii-Southern California plan.

A Navy training area site on Maui looks close to the Kihei Canoe Club, Maui Canoe Club, the Pinks, the Kihei Youth Center, many homes, townhouses, vacation condos, and the longest uninterrupted white sand beach in our state.  Also nearby are Keālia Pond National Wildlife Refuge and the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary (the only U.S. sanctuary dedicated to the protection of humpback whales and their marine environment); the critically endangered hawksbill turtles nest along these beaches.

Images below are from the Navy’s proposal on display at our Kahului Public Library:



Report and images from <http://go.usa.gov/xUnDC>

Please join me and many others in Hawaii (and beyond); say NO to U.S. Navy practice for war — above, on, and below our beautiful ocean waters, off shore, near shore, and on land! 

Instead, the U.S. Navy could practice peace.  Because of the changing climate and the resulting weather related impacts, the Navy could be sending out forces for training and rescue and rebuilding.  They could do more missions of real search and rescue:  people need help in Indonesia, Saipan . . . California.  Flint, Michigan could have all its corroded water pipes replaced.  The infrastructure needs in the U.S. are endless.  Our military personnel could be learning useful and welcomed skills. 

If you live on Maui, have visited here, or want to come some day, let your voice be heard. If you care about humpback whales, Hawaiian monk seals, endangered marine life, coral, let your voice be heard. Our U.S. military could be instruments of peace.

If it is still January 7, 2019, where you are, please let the U.S. Navy know how you feel by sending an email to <NFPAC-RECEIVE@navy.mil>.

Then, any time, please email Hawaii Governor David Y. Ige at <https://governor.hawaii.gov/>. Whether you live here or not, he needs to know what you think.

We live in a very special place of Hawaiian aloha and beauty. We hope you find it that way when you come to visit.

In Peace & Aloha, Renée

Thought for the Day: From Outrage to Transformation!

“The supreme task is to organize and unite people so that their anger becomes a transforming force.” 

Martin Luther King, Jr. supported his philosophy of nonviolence with six
fundamental principles in his book Stride for Freedom, but even he had this to say about the important influence of outrage:

You can use Charity Navigator to help focus your fury. As the nation’s largest independent charity evaluator, CN provides free charity ratings and other resources to help you find a trustworthy charity that is fighting for the cause you believe in.” –  Danielle Cheeseman

From: <http://blog.charitynavigator.org/2018/12/rage-giving-how-to-find-charity-that.html#at_pco=smlwn-1.0&at_si=5c16912a2bd14b3a&at_ab=per-2&at_pos=0&at_tot=1&gt;

The Salvation Army Logo

Doing the Most Good®

A less well-known charity evaluator is Give Well – <https://www.givewell.org/>

Give Well rates organizations mainly on how effective their projects actually are. The organizations that Give Well recommends are evidence-backed, thoroughly vetted, and underfunded.  Often the focus is on how many lives a project saves. 

Instead of giving another dust collector to each of your relatives this holiday, give a gift to a charity to help others &/or to promote positive changes in the world.

Happy Holidays.  Aloha, Renee

Banner photo: http://Photo by erin walker on Unsplash

The New Poor Peoples’ Campaign

America’s Moral Malady

The nation’s problem isn’t that we don’t have enough money. It’s that we don’t have the moral capacity to face what ails society.

Jill Freedman / Getty

Image above: Americans, young and old, dwell in Resurrection City, made of tents and wooden shanties, during the 1968 Poor People’s Campaign, in Washington, D.C.

In the summer of 1966, Martin Luther King Jr. visited homes in the hamlet of Marks, Mississippi. Later he remembered the hundreds of children who lacked shoes. A mother told King that her children had no clothes for school. The Nobel laureate wept openly. “They didn’t even have any blankets to cover their children up on a cold night,” he recalled. “And I said to myself, God does not like this.” Then he vowed, “We are going to say in no uncertain terms that we aren’t going to accept it any longer. We’ve got to go to Washington in big numbers.”

In March 1968, King brought together a group of more than 50 leaders representing Black Belt sharecroppers, Appalachian coal miners, Chicano farmworkers, and American Indians, among others, to join the Poor People’s Campaign. The poor, “both white and Negro, live in a cruelly unjust society,” he said. “If they can be helped to take action together, they will do so with a freedom and a power that will be a new and unsettling force in our complacent national life.”

America’s sickness was spiritual—and would be terminal, King insisted, unless we experienced a “radical revolution of values.” A shift to the left or the right could not save us; only a movement that changed the moral narrative could refocus our priorities on building a society that honored the dignity of every person. This country had to be born again—not only in budgets and policy decisions, but in spirit.

The preacher in King knew that such a moral revival could not simply be spoken into existence. Poor people, who are so often pitted against one another, needed to unite in a national campaign of direct action to save America’s soul, King told the staff of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Today we face a national crisis that is in many ways an intensifying of the storm that rocked America in 1968. But too often, our attempts to diagnose what ails us cannot get past the tired debates of left-versus-right politics. King’s analysis was that interlocking systems of violence, literal and metaphorical—which he called racism, poverty, and militarism—blinded most Americans to the lives of people in places like Marks. Until a Poor People’s Campaign compelled Americans to see “them” as “us,” the ideal of America would remain beyond reach.In the richest society in human history, nearly half of the population lives in poverty or is struggling to make ends meet.

Four diseases, all connected, now threaten the nation’s social and moral health: racism, poverty, environmental devastation, and the war economy—sanctified by the heresy of Christian nationalism. Since the 2016 presidential election, when white rage propelled a candidate endorsed by the Ku Klux Klan into the White House, racism has been more prominent in public life. Nearly every politician in the United States condemned “hate” after the violence by anti-black, anti-Semitic, and anti-gay white nationalists in Charlottesville, Virginia, last summer. Racism and white supremacy, however, are not about hate. They are about power.

The question is not whether politicians condemn hate, but whether they promote the policy agenda of white supremacy. Since 2010, we have seen an assault on voting rights in numerous state legislatures, which the Supreme Court exacerbated in 2013 by gutting a crucial provision of the Voting Rights Act. The states that attack voting rights by using partisan gerrymandering, discriminatory voter-identification requirements, or a rollback of early voting and same-day registration are also home to the lowest wages, the severest poverty, the greatest hostility toward immigrants and the LGBT community, and the deepest cuts in education funding. Politicians who try to suppress voting are using their power to hurt the poor and the working class—white, brown, and black.

In the richest society in human history, nearly half of the population lives in poverty or is struggling to make ends meet. More than half of African American workers and nearly 60 percent of Latino workers are paid less than $15 an hour. In the South, half of all jobs pay less than $15 an hour. During the past five years, state legislatures have stepped in to override many of the municipalities where the “Fight for $15” has succeeded.

Meanwhile, the nation’s economic growth, especially since the Great Recession, has overwhelmingly benefited the wealthiest among us. Wall Street got bailouts while working Americans saw their jobs shipped overseas or outsourced to contractors. The top 400 taxpayers earn an average of $97,000 an hour, while people are arrested for protesting because they can’t survive on $7.25 an hour, the minimum that Washington requires.

Environmental dangers also disproportionately hurt the poor. In Flint, Michigan, poor people can buy unleaded gasoline but can’t get unleaded water from the tap. Oil companies are drilling for natural gas on Apache lands, penetrating the aquifers. Coal ash has spilled into rivers, and pipelines are being built through sacred territory. Federal deregulation is opening the door to new fossil-fuel exploration and mining in Alaska, contributing to climate change and scarring native lands.There’s only one way out: for people directly harmed by the economic and political system to fight as one against the few who benefit from it.

The unending war economy has made everything worse. Out of each discretionary federal dollar spent, 54 cents goes to the military. This is money that is not spent on health care, education, affordable housing, or infrastructure. We’ve paid more than $4 trillion since 2001 to fight the War on Terror while claiming that we lack the resources to furnish decent medical care for every American.

Our problem isn’t that we don’t have enough money. It’s that we don’t have the moral capacity to face what ails our society.

While a thorough analysis of America’s moral malady may tempt us to despair, it also brings us face-to-face with the ethical challenge that inspired the first Poor People’s Campaign. The children in Marks made King weep, just as pictures of children burned by napalm in Vietnam had brought him to tears, because he knew that their cruel reality wasn’t inevitable. As James Baldwin wrote: “We made the world we’re living in and we have to make it over.” To King, the Poor People’s Campaign was about America’s need for another Reconstruction—for an acknowledgment that a system of race-based slavery had created the inequality that had been passed down to the present day.

This confluence of troubles may seem overwhelming. It suggests, however, that the only way out is for people directly harmed by the economic and political system to fight as one against the few who benefit from it.

In 1968, the idea—a Poor People’s Campaign to unite activists from across the nation and bring them to Washington to shut down the government, to bring the issue of poverty compellingly to the fore—looked impossible. Except there was no other way. The tent city in Washington was snuffed out after six weeks by riot police and tear gas. Even so, the campaign had a lasting influence on national policies, as seen in the additional spending for Head Start, subsidized school lunches and food programs in poverty-stricken counties, and the creation of the Children’s Defense Fund, which has pushed legislation to help poor children and families for the past half century.

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Still, we have never completed the Reconstruction that our federal government admitted was necessary after the Civil War. Just as the Poor People’s Campaign proposed, the Reconstruction we need now must arise from the efforts of people harmed directly by racism, poverty, environmental degradation, and the war economy. That is the inspiration for the new Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival, which is coordinating direct actions across the country that will begin in May. Activists in at least 32 states and Washington, D.C., will join in 40 days of civil disobedience, including an encampment in the nation’s capital, in hopes of building the power of the poor and the working class to reset the national agenda.

Only by joining together and asserting our authority as children of God can we shift the moral narrative in this nation and create a movement that will challenge those in power to form the “more perfect union” to which we aspire. Now as in 1968, this notion looks impossible. Except, again, there is no other way.


This article appears in the special MLK issue print edition with the headline “A New Poor People’s Campaign.”  Atlantic Monthly

Let’s support what needs – and must – be done.  Aloha,
Renée

Thought for the Day: Racism

“[I]n 1860  only around ‘5 percent of the Southern population owned even one slave, and a significantly smaller percentage owned more than twenty.’ . . .

Millions of human beings were held in bondage.  It’s mind-boggling to me [says author Camille T. Dungy]  that such a small number of people controlled so much of the wealth back then — and much of that wealth was accrued through the bodies of other human beings.  A black human being was a commodity, an object, not particularly different in value from a piece of jewelry, a few head of livestock, or several bolts of fabric.  My point is that most white people didn’t have the kind of wealth that the institution of slavery was protecting, just like most people today don’t have the kind of wealth protected by tax codes that allow a billionaire to write off a private jet but don’t allow schoolteachers to write off $250 worth of school supplies. . . .

America would not be the wealthy country it is without slave labor.  We would not have our power or wealth if we had not, for a very long time, depended on the unpaid labor of millions  of human beings . . . Cotton wasn’t king just in the South.  Many of the most productive cotton mills were in the North, as were the insurance companies and other industries that profited off those mills.  Without a lot of unpaid labor, those profits would have been significantly less.  And we are still depending on the unpaid or underpaid labor of millions of human beings — from prison workers to immigrants to foreign labor.  The question of slavery is still with us [my emphasis].  America has a legacy of harming other human beings and justifying that harm by glorifying the wealth it brings to a few.  Thankfully America also has a legacy of resisting that impulse. . . .

It’s sometimes difficult to accept the fact that whole portions of our society were built up–are still built up– to support the wealth of just a few.  Why don’t more people object to that?  Perhaps because so many Americans think maybe one day they will be the billionaire with access to the unchecked power to acquire wealth at the expense of other human beings.  When the focus is on the glorification of wealth rather than on an honest examination of how that wealth might have been accrued, we routinely ignore brutalities visited upon our fellow human beings (7). . . .

“Racism – and resistance to racism – is part of the fabric of this country.  When our twenty-dollar bill celebrates a man who is connected to the genocide of Native Americans and the enslavement of black people, I can’t see how I can say, ‘Let’s just focus on this one area.’ We are part of an ecosystem.  We can’t just worry about the whales, so to speak.  We need to address what’s happening to our oceans.

But, as individuals, I know we sometimes have to choose the battles that matter most to us” (9).

There is much to do to make our world more just and equitable for all. Let’s get working.

Aloha, Renee

From:  “Poetic Justice: Camille T. Dungy on Racism, Writing, and Radical Empathy” by Airica Parker – The Sun, June 2018, p. 4-12.

Banner photo:  Andrew Jackson – Popular General in the United States Army and from 1829 to 1837, seventh President of the United States.

Quotation: from Hawaii Queen Lili’ uokalani

Some Hawaiians here in our state don’t vote because our U.S. government overthrew the legal monarchy  of the Hawaiian Kingdom in 1893 when businessmen (children of U.S. missionaries) garnered the help of a U.S. warship in the Honolulu harbor threatening mass killing of the Hawaiians.  Queen Lili’uokalani, the royal monarch,  acquiesced, to prevent the deaths of her people.  She hoped the United States President would right the situation. Though President Cleveland and his special commissioner James Blount supported the return of the Queen’s sovereignty, the Provisional Government refused to step down. They quickly proclaimed themselves the Republic of Hawai’i and by 1898 they’d received status as a U.S. Territory.  Nothing was done to reinstate the islands to the Hawaiian people.

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U.S. plantation owners and businessmen worried about the influence of the popular Queen Lili’uokalani and overthrew the legal monarchy

Image from: http://www.hawaiihistory.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=ig.page&PageID=312

So it is very understandable that some Hawaiians today don’t want to be part of this system.

However, when you don’t vote and make your voice heard, the ones who do vote win for their ideas, their way of life, their benefit.

Besides, Queen Lili’uokalani saw that having a vote was important!

Queen-Lili'uokalani

Photo from Ki’ope Raymond, Hawaiian Language Professor, University of Hawaii Maui College

“We have no other direction left to pursue, except this unrestricted right to vote. Given by the U.S. to you the Lahui [the Hawaiian Nation], grasp it and hold on to it.  It is up to you to make things right for all of us in the Future.”  Queen Lili’uokalani

So if you are Hawaiian, please make choices that will be the best for you, your family, your community.

And for those of us who aren’t Native Hawaiians, I’ve learned that it is important to vote for the candidates for the Office of Hawaiian Affairs.  Until this last Primary Election in August, I left those three spots unchecked each election – because I’m not Hawaiian and didn’t think I had a real right to be making those choices.  However, I’ve learned that the Hawaiian community can use our  votes if they are well informed.  The mission of the Office of Hawaiian Affairs includes protecting the ‘aina and Hawaiians.  What is good for the land and the Hawaiian people is likely good for all of us.

It’s not too late in Hawaii to register to vote (although official early registration ended last Tuesday, October 9th).  The Maui County Clerk’s Office is relaxing deadlines, so if you have valid identification with you, you can register to vote on the day you vote.

Early walk-in voting here on Maui is October 23-November 3, Monday – Saturday, 8am- 4pm at the Velma McWayne Santos Community Center in Wailuku.

The General Election is November 6, 7am-6pm at your designated polling place.

Watch for the various candidate forums.  Kihei Community Center has another one this Tuesday, Oct. 16  at St. Theresa Church.  Go to <olvr.hawaii.gov>, put in your address, and see the ballot for you.  UHMC will be having a “Teach In.”  Get informed.

Then VOTE.  Queen Lili’uokalani knew it was important.  Our future depends on it.

Aloha, Renée

Banner photo: https://www.biography.com/people/liliuokalani-39552

 

 

Quotation: Thank you, President Trump

Garth-Lenz_Camp-family

Mekasi Camp Horinek and Pipeline Fighters

On March 23, 2017,  President Trump signed the permit approving the Keystone XL oil pipeline – where Native American led protests, says Wikipedia, have united environmental groups, citizens, and politicians over the potential negative impacts of the Keystone XL project.[92] The main issues are the risk of oil spills along the pipeline, which would traverse highly sensitive terrain, and 17% higher greenhouse gas emissions from the extraction of oil sands compared to extraction of conventional oil.[93][94]

On that day, Mekasi Camp Horinek, a member of the Ponca Nation, told reporter Alleen Brown:

“I want to say thank you to the president for all the bad decisions that he’s making — for the bad cabinet appointments that he’s made and for awakening a sleeping giant.  People that have never stood up for themselves, people that have never had their voices heard, that have never put their bodies on the line are now outraged.  I would like to say thank you to President Trump for his bigotry, for his sexism,

[for his attacks on our environment, for his support of gun rights over the rights of our children to be safe in schools, for his attacks on immigrants – in this country that is filled with people whose ancestors came as immigrants, for snubbing our Allies and becoming cozy with ruthless dictators, for celebrating hate and disrespect, for filling the pockets of the richest from the suffering of the poorest,  . . .]

for bringing all of us in this nation together to stand up and unite

From: Naomi Klein’s NO IS NOT ENOUGH: Resisting Trump’s Shock Politics and Winning the World We Need, p. 190-191.

Let’s stand together and VOTE on November 6th.

Aloha, in light and action, Renée

 

Banner source: https://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2016/08/listen-mekasi-camp-horinek-on-standing.html

Barry’s Gleanings: “Free California of Fossil Fuels” By Bill McKibben

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In a recent New York Times Opinion piece, environmentalist Bill McKibben,  founder of 350.org, a group seeking to build clean solutions for the world’s energy needs, notes the possibility and importance of California state legislation.

“The State Senate passed a measure last year that would commit California, the world’s fifth-largest economy, to running on 100 percent clean energy by 2045. Now it is up to the Assembly to provide crucial leadership by passing that legislation, S.B. 100. If any place on earth can handle this transition, it’s California, home to some of the planet’s strongest sunshine and many of its finest clean-tech entrepreneurs.

Already, thanks to strong efforts at efficiency and conservation and the falling price of solar power, the average California household spends almost 50 percent less on energy than the average family in, say, Louisiana. But unless the Assembly passes S.B. 100 before the current session ends, much of that momentum will evaporate. After great organizing (including from my colleagues at 350.org chapters across the state), 72 percent of Californians back the bill; it’s now a test of confidence versus cravenness for members of the Assembly.

The governor, Jerry Brown, has been strangely quiet on S.B. 100, which is odd since it should be the no-brainer capstone to his clean-energy endeavors. After the governor’s years of leading efforts to deal with the demand side of the energy equation, activists are now also demanding he show equal attention to the supply side. His administration routinely grants new permits for oil and gas drilling, leading not only to more carbon emissions but also to drill rigs and derricks next to the houses, schools and hospitals of the state’s poorest residents: From rural Kern County to south-central Los Angeles, nearly 70 percent of the people living near wells are minorities. . . “

See the complete article at –

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/08/08/opinion/fires-california-fossil-fuels.html?hpw&rref=opinion&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&module=well-

Aloha, Barry (and Renee)

P.S. Thanks, Sue for sending this article to us.

Image by: Mikey Burton

 

What you must see about “survivors” of the A-bombing of Hiroshima & Nagasaki. What you can do to promote peace and end war!

If you – and your elected officials – need another convincing reason to do everything possible to prevent another nuclear bombing, read Melinda Clarke’s book, Waymakers for Peace and if possible, go to her free talk on Saturday, August 4, 2018 at 1:30p.m. at the Nisei Veterans Memorial Center campus in Kahului, Maui.  Call  808  244-6862 to make reservations or for more information.

Now a resident of Maui, Melinda Clarke first went to Japan in 1964 and then returned for many years.  She saw her mission was to record what most people – especially in the U.S. – don’t really want to know.  In her book of interviews, Waymakers for Peace, and in her talks, Clarke gives a  a clear understanding of the devastation and suffering caused by a nuclear weapon (much less powerful  than the ones we have today).     Clarke also suggests what citizens can do to promote peace and end war.

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Melinda Clarke taught English in Japan for many years – and interviewed A-bomb “survivors”

In one of the interview from her book Waymakers for Peace, Melinda Clarke reports on the experience of a Japanese civilian, a young woman at the time who became a hospital head nurse,  Taira says,
“I was just eighteen at the time . . .
I didn’t get to the hospital until three days after the bombing in Nagasaki, but when I did, I was overwhelmed.  So many of the patients couldn’t walk, so they crawled down the wooden halls, and even though I was inside the classrooms attending to patients, I could hear their bones, bare bone with flesh torn off them, hitting on the wooden floor.
Patients came in and their bodies were swollen.  If one place on the skin was broken, the maggots got under the skin.  The summer was very hot and the smell of all those dead bodies rotting and blood from wounds brought swarms of flies.  One fly can give many, many maggots.
Maggots not only entered the body through cuts, but also through the nose and ears of patients.  Once inside, they ate.
Days after the bombing a healthy-looking person would suddenly start to bleed profusely from the mouth or nose for instance and then die.  If we opened the body, we would find intestines infested with maggots or some vital organ that the maggots were feasting on.
As horrible as it sounds, the maggots helped us in one way because they ate all the rotten parts of the body.  They ate all the disease and infections, but we had to take them off soon or else they would eat everything.
Another thing I remember is seeing babies sucking milk from their mothers’ breasts even after the mothers were dead . . .
A day doesn’t go by that I don’t remember or see a result of that brief moment. In just a flash at 11:02 a.m., [August 9, 1945] in my city [Nagasaki], so many of my friends were just erased from the earth.  Those who were left lay on the ground looking like worms.
Today, most people still don’t realize how horrible the A-bomb was.  Somehow people must be made aware, then those who make bombs from the government to the taxpayer will never use it.  If they do, after knowing the misery, hell and brutality, then they are not human beings.  They are animals. . . . “
Besides other such vivid interviews in her book, Melinda includes a list of groups actively working for peace.  Check them out – and take action now:
– WorldBeyondWar.org  https://worldbeyondwar.org/
– Veterans for Peace https://www.veteransforpeace.org/
– Global Conference in Toronto 9/21-9/22#NoWar2018 https://worldbeyondwar.org/nowar2018/
– International Committee to Abolish War  http://www.icanw.org/
Harpers Magazine, February 2018 “War No More” – for subscribers only on line, but go to your library
– Physicians for Social Responsibility – “We must prevent what we cannot heal: Mobilizing health professionals on issues that represent the gravest dangers to human  health.”  https://www.psr.org/
– RootsAction.org  “For secure elections and true national security” RootsAction.org
In our world of leaders trading treats and treating others as threats, the rest of us must take action to move toward peace.
Melinda Clarke first went to Japan in 1964 as a tourist and fell in love with the culture and the people.  As a student of the ’60s, she has been an activist, but it it was while protesting the Three Mile Island nuclear plant accident in 1979 in Pennsylvania that she knew she must do more.
She felt a calling to return to Japan and interview hibakusha, or atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki.  Surely the reports of the Japanese “survivors” –   of suffering, destruction, and death would make the world realize that nuclear war could not be a choice.
Clarke, bringing her two young children, returned to Japan in the 1980s where she taught English on and off for about 10 years and conducted interviews with as many “survivors” as she could find.  Her interviews with the hibakusha shifted her worldview: she has become an avid advocate for peace.
Her book is a compilation of some of those hibakusha stories.  Clarke wants to preserve their voices that can serve as a way toward peace.  If the world’s people really knew the suffering that nuclear weapons cause, there would have to be nuclear disarmament.  The hibakusha, she sees, can lead us toward peace.
You can order Waymakers for Peace by contacting Melinda at her email: mepoclarke@gmail.  She hopes to have a Website soon for the book, but in the meantime, the book is by donation (please include shipping costs).
Today, she tries to inspire others to live a life of peace and purpose.
Clarke recently walked the Japanese Shikoku Pilgrimage of 900 miles and 88 temples!
This Fall, Clarke  plans to deliver Waymakers for Peace in person to all U.S. Congressional members – 535 elected officials!
On August 4, 2018, here on Maui, Melinda Clarke is presenting a free talk that begins at 1:30 p.m. at the Nisei Veterans Memorial Center as part of Hiroshima and Nagasaki Remembrance Days.
She will show the documentary Lost Generation with actual U.S. military footage of the aftermath of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima.
Clarke  was gifted those films while conducting interviews of hibakusha.   The film is part of documents made public after 30 years under the Freedom of Information Act and purchased with funds provided by  the Japanese “10 Feet Movement.”
According to a recent Maui News article, Melinda Clarke’s “talk Journey Toward Peace will touch upon her interviews with hibakusha survivors and what citizens can do to promote peace and end war. The event will take place at the Oceanview Maui Adult Day Care Center on the Nisei Veterans Memorial Center campus in Kahului.The event is free and open to the public, but reservations are required due to space limitations. The movie includes some graphic wartime footage and viewer discretion is advised.To make reservations or for more information, call 244-6862 or email deidre@ nvmc.org.”See the full article at <http://www.mauinews.com/news/local-news/2018/07/hiroshima-bombing-documentary-talk-by-author-aug-4/>

 

On August 11, 2018, The Maui News featured an article by Lee Imada about Melinda Clarke and her experiences and mission.  Go to http://www.mauinews.com/news/local-news/2018/08/maui-woman-tells-stories-of-atomic-bombing-at-hiroshima/

Clarke’s website can be found at http://www.worldaloha.net.

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Clips of the original photographs (very troubling) We must work to make sure this never happens again.  “Lost Generation” can be viewed at .https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IUv-wBK00eM&app=desktop

Let the voices of those who experienced the Hiroshima & Nagasaki bombings lead us on the way toward peace.

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Image released 30 years after the dropping of the A-bomb.  From Melinda’s presentation

Become an instrument of peace – for peace.  We all must know — and act.
Aloha – in light and love, Renée

 

 

Barry’s Gleanings: “Separate and Unequal: Chuck Collins on how wealth divides us”

Not only was his great-grandfather Oscar Mayer, of hot-dog fame, and thus Chuck Collins had four generations of stable wealth in his family, but Collins also came to realize as a white male American born into a family in the wealthiest 1 percent, he had great privileges while his neighbors in Detroit dealt with grave racial and economic and societal  challenges and inequities.

Among other ideas, Collins sees, “The wealthy need to care about other people’s kids, too.  If your kid is getting a debt-free college education because of your family’s wealth, then you should fight like hell for every other kid to have the same opportunity.  If you don’t, you’re perpetuating the cycle of inequality” (10).

In the following interview with Megan Wildhood, published in The Sun, (February 2018, Issue 506, p. 6-14), Collins shares why we must recognize that we are all completely intertwined in ways we haven’t even begun to understand – and take personal action to support equality and justice – in nature , in community, with other sentient beings.

Please read the following link for Chuck Collins insights and good ideas:

“Separate and Unequal” 

https://www.thesunmagazine.org/issues/506/separate-and-unequal>

Also, the most recent issue of Yes magazine focuses on affordable housing.  It’s a fabulous collection of examples of what is actually being done.  Included is Collins’ commentary:  “Make Them Pay:  The Global Wealth-Hiding, Ultra-Rich Elites”

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Chuck Collins

“Collins is a director of the Program on Inequality at the Institute for Policy Studies, where he co-edits Inequality.org. He is author of several books, including 99 to 1 and Born on Third Base: A One Percenter Makes the Case for Tackling Inequality, Bringing Wealth Home, and Committing to the Common Good. His latest is Is Inequality in America Irreversible? (Polity Press).”  – from Yes! Summer 2018, No. 86, p. 37.

Yes! Affordable-Housing issue:  

Communities Creating Economical Homes, Protecting a Renter Nation, a Different American Dream:

 

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Images from “YES!” :

Read this fabulous issue for multiple solutions to the housing crisis.

What can you do to support and promote equality and justice where you live?

Aloha, Renée

Banner photo – http://issues.yesmagazine.org/issue/affordable-housing/theme.html

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