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2019 Women’s March – Maui

We were back at UHMC for the third time – for many of the same issues. Again, the spirit was mainly up-beat with the knowledge that there is much to be done – and we can unite – and we will not wait for others to speak and act for us.

The third Woman’s March – Jan. 19, 2019 at the UHMC campu

Women and men, old and young gathered for a few hours of music, inspiring speakers, socializing, learning about new issues, and just generally being re-inspired to keep working for the values we support.

Nursing professor Kathleen brought her daughter. Paddling sister Gail brought her 90-year-old mother and two sisters from the U.S. Mainland.
Flags and banners added color and declared interests

According to “The Maui News,” about 2,000 people participated in our Women’s March in Kahului. One participant expressed what many felt: “he came out to support women’s rights and to support the planet’s rights and to try to have solidarity with everyone who’s turning to the positive side instead of the negative side” (A 1).

One of our Maui event organizers, Robin Pilus, noted, “At the very beginning, we felt we could make a difference; it seemed like we could sprint, with all that energy. Now we realized it will be a long-distance run.” (A 3).

I thought this sign was from an environmental group – but no. Many signs were fun and funny!

The guy with the bullhorn from last year was back. As we marched off campus, he screamed at us, “You are going to hell!!” One of his signs noted, “Feminism makes women hate men!” Most of us just ignored him since he showed no interest in actually talking with anyone. He might actually want to check his sources. 🙂 Science is good.

Many groups came: Moms Demand Action – for sane gun laws; http://www.KeepYour Power.org – because of carcinogen components involved, this group is against 5G cell antennas and “Smart Meters”; Pro-Choice – for a woman’s rights over her body; LGBT groups for human rights; immigrants – for just treatment; people concerned about the U.S. Navy plans to have training missions in our beautiful waters and near shores; environmental groups – for protection of our marine life and shores. . . .

Other signs said, “Build Houses, Not Walls,” “Compassion for All”. . .

This was on my T-shirt – getting new voters to sign up is what I like to do.

I carried this sign. The back declared, “We Stand Against Oppression! Flo, who I know from water testing and the Humpback Whale Sanctuary, made my sign and others. Mahalo 🙂
Helping and supporting one another is what our community does.

Many people came to the march, and we know that many more were with us in spirit.

We have much hope for the future.

There is much for everyone to do. Let’s keep working. Blessings and hope to you wherever you are.

Aloha, Renée

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U.S. Navy Plans for Special Operations Training in Maui County (and beyond)

The U.S. Navy in its practice for war has a history in Maui County. Among other actions, the Navy used our eighth largest Hawaiian island, Kaho’olawe, a place sacred to Hawaiians, for target practice. Starting in 1941. Kaho’olawe was transformed into a bombing range with ship-to-shore bombardment and later with American submarines testing torpedoes by firing them at shoreline cliffs.  They even simulated the blast effects of nuclear weapons on shipboard weapon systems.  Although Kaho’olawe is about six miles from Maui, our island windows shook at the bombing impacts.  During the Navy testing and practice, a few of the torpedoes missed  – and landed on Maui!  

Despite decades of protest, the Navy continued the bombings until 1990! The results: a dead island where although over 9 million tons of debris and un-exploded ordinances have been removed, no one can live, no one can even visit without getting special permission because it is still too dangerous to be there.  I can see Kaho’olawe from the deck of my house. The Navy spent millions to clean it up, but there are still un-exploded Navy bombs there; I’m not likely ever to go there.  

The U.S. Navy has a new plan. According to the January 4, 2019 edition of “The Maui News,” the Navy says, “[T]here will be no live-fire or amphibious assault craft and aircraft landings as part of their proposed exercises around Maui County . . .The Navy is proposing nearshore water training in the county, which will include naval special operation personnel diving and swimming and launching and recovering small vehicles designed to operate underwater” (A 1).

Also, the Navy had said they would accept public comment until today (January 7) – but before the deadline, they announced they had decided to go ahead with their proposals!

What the Navy says in its plan to go ahead with training exercises is much more limited than what it puts forth as possibilities in the four huge volumes of its Hawaii-Southern California plan.

A Navy training area site on Maui looks close to the Kihei Canoe Club, Maui Canoe Club, the Pinks, the Kihei Youth Center, many homes, townhouses, vacation condos, and the longest uninterrupted white sand beach in our state.  Also nearby are Keālia Pond National Wildlife Refuge and the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary (the only U.S. sanctuary dedicated to the protection of humpback whales and their marine environment); the critically endangered hawksbill turtles nest along these beaches.

Images below are from the Navy’s proposal on display at our Kahului Public Library:



Report and images from <http://go.usa.gov/xUnDC>

Please join me and many others in Hawaii (and beyond); say NO to U.S. Navy practice for war — above, on, and below our beautiful ocean waters, off shore, near shore, and on land! 

Instead, the U.S. Navy could practice peace.  Because of the changing climate and the resulting weather related impacts, the Navy could be sending out forces for training and rescue and rebuilding.  They could do more missions of real search and rescue:  people need help in Indonesia, Saipan . . . California.  Flint, Michigan could have all its corroded water pipes replaced.  The infrastructure needs in the U.S. are endless.  Our military personnel could be learning useful and welcomed skills. 

If you live on Maui, have visited here, or want to come some day, let your voice be heard. If you care about humpback whales, Hawaiian monk seals, endangered marine life, coral, let your voice be heard. Our U.S. military could be instruments of peace.

If it is still January 7, 2019, where you are, please let the U.S. Navy know how you feel by sending an email to <NFPAC-RECEIVE@navy.mil>.

Then, any time, please email Hawaii Governor David Y. Ige at <https://governor.hawaii.gov/>. Whether you live here or not, he needs to know what you think.

We live in a very special place of Hawaiian aloha and beauty. We hope you find it that way when you come to visit.

In Peace & Aloha, Renée

Quotation: from Hawaii Queen Lili’ uokalani

Some Hawaiians here in our state don’t vote because our U.S. government overthrew the legal monarchy  of the Hawaiian Kingdom in 1893 when businessmen (children of U.S. missionaries) garnered the help of a U.S. warship in the Honolulu harbor threatening mass killing of the Hawaiians.  Queen Lili’uokalani, the royal monarch,  acquiesced, to prevent the deaths of her people.  She hoped the United States President would right the situation. Though President Cleveland and his special commissioner James Blount supported the return of the Queen’s sovereignty, the Provisional Government refused to step down. They quickly proclaimed themselves the Republic of Hawai’i and by 1898 they’d received status as a U.S. Territory.  Nothing was done to reinstate the islands to the Hawaiian people.

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U.S. plantation owners and businessmen worried about the influence of the popular Queen Lili’uokalani and overthrew the legal monarchy

Image from: http://www.hawaiihistory.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=ig.page&PageID=312

So it is very understandable that some Hawaiians today don’t want to be part of this system.

However, when you don’t vote and make your voice heard, the ones who do vote win for their ideas, their way of life, their benefit.

Besides, Queen Lili’uokalani saw that having a vote was important!

Queen-Lili'uokalani

Photo from Ki’ope Raymond, Hawaiian Language Professor, University of Hawaii Maui College

“We have no other direction left to pursue, except this unrestricted right to vote. Given by the U.S. to you the Lahui [the Hawaiian Nation], grasp it and hold on to it.  It is up to you to make things right for all of us in the Future.”  Queen Lili’uokalani

So if you are Hawaiian, please make choices that will be the best for you, your family, your community.

And for those of us who aren’t Native Hawaiians, I’ve learned that it is important to vote for the candidates for the Office of Hawaiian Affairs.  Until this last Primary Election in August, I left those three spots unchecked each election – because I’m not Hawaiian and didn’t think I had a real right to be making those choices.  However, I’ve learned that the Hawaiian community can use our  votes if they are well informed.  The mission of the Office of Hawaiian Affairs includes protecting the ‘aina and Hawaiians.  What is good for the land and the Hawaiian people is likely good for all of us.

It’s not too late in Hawaii to register to vote (although official early registration ended last Tuesday, October 9th).  The Maui County Clerk’s Office is relaxing deadlines, so if you have valid identification with you, you can register to vote on the day you vote.

Early walk-in voting here on Maui is October 23-November 3, Monday – Saturday, 8am- 4pm at the Velma McWayne Santos Community Center in Wailuku.

The General Election is November 6, 7am-6pm at your designated polling place.

Watch for the various candidate forums.  Kihei Community Center has another one this Tuesday, Oct. 16  at St. Theresa Church.  Go to <olvr.hawaii.gov>, put in your address, and see the ballot for you.  UHMC will be having a “Teach In.”  Get informed.

Then VOTE.  Queen Lili’uokalani knew it was important.  Our future depends on it.

Aloha, Renée

Banner photo: https://www.biography.com/people/liliuokalani-39552

 

 

Peace Poems – Maui Celebration

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Peace Poem winners on Maui

Recognizing the importance of peace in our hearts, our families, our schools, our community, and the world, the annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Peace Poetry Contest recently celebrated its 19th year here on Maui –  The awards ceremony, held on April 20, 2018 at the Mayor Hannibal Tavares Community Center, presented the winners from approximately 500 Maui County student entries.   I attended this  Maui style celebration:   proud parents and friends brought leis and balloons to recognize the students,  who dressed in their best clothes and had the biggest smiles.

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Proud families

 

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Peace Poem Celebration audience

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Proud family – proud kids at the Maui Peace Poem celebration

The non-violent approach to living in the world continues to be celebrated in one way through the words and insights of the students – in the footsteps of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.  Here in Hawaii, Melinda Gohn has been the guiding light of the Peace Poem project.

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Melinda Gohn – proud “mother hen” coaching Kihei Kamali’i 5th grader Jackson W. Noble whose poem reflected on gun violence in our schools.

Melinda has help from loyal volunteers.

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Volunteer Pat Rouse (L) checking in Peace Poem winners

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At left, Julia Getty-Gordon opened the celebration by singing “Where Have All the Flowers Gone?”  Mayor Arakawa’s representative  is on the right.

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Melinda and Mistress of Ceremonies, Ayin Adams,

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Audience members – of all ages – came to celebrate and recognize the peace poem awardees

More than 70 students, including four from Molokai,  were recognized for their poems:  thoughts and words of peace.

As part of the ceremony, Melinda had us close our eyes – and imagine the past.

Suddenly, we heard a voice resonate through the hall and opened our eyes to see the august Bryant Neal presenting  Dr. Martin Luther King, J’s  “I Have a Dream” speech!  Fantastic!!

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Bryant Neal – presenting “I Have A Dream”

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Melinda Gohn, contest director, a student winner,  and Ayin Adams, Mistress of Ceremony

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Melinda, Olena Rondeau, who earned the grand prize  for her poem, and Ayin

The Maui County grand prize for her award-winning poem “I Am Running” went to Olena Rondeau, a 4th grader at Roots School of Maui.    She was present with a canvas painting donated by Maui artist Davo.  Of the poem, Melinda Gohn said in The Maui News article about the event, “Rondeau’s poem uses immediacy with unusually perceptive images and metaphors to create an experiential poem uniquely reflecting Hawaii and the innocence of a planet at peace” ( May 6, 2018 p. B8).

I Am Running

I am running through a gardenia scented twilight

Beneath a raspberry, dark blue and purple sky I am running . . . .

Above me, a canopy of stars

Millions of tiny pinpoints of light

Shining in the night. . . .

Suddenly a meteor streaks across the sky

Red-yellow flames light up the night.

The falling star reminds me

that the world is full of magic”

by Olena Rondeau.

At the ceremony, Gwyn Gorg, President of the African Americans On Maui Association, congratulated Rondeau and all the contest winners and spoke of the importance of a peaceful Maui community.

Hawaii Governor Ige provided certificates for top winners, Mayor Alan Arakawa gave all winners a certificate, and the International Peace Poem Project gave a prize poster commemorating Dr King.

All the islands have such award ceremonies.  The Molokai awards are set for May 30 from 5:30 – 6:30 p.m at the Molokai Library; the Oahu awards are June 9, 9:30-11:30 a.m. at the Mission Memorial Auditorium.

Congratulations to all involved for recognizing the importance of peace in our hearts, our families, our schools, our community, and the world.

Aloha (in light & peace),  Renée

Kathy’s Garden: UpCountry, Maui – Splendor

For 25 years, Kathy has been tending her garden.  The result is spectacular.  Recently,  friends Audrey, Gail, and I were invited UpCountry to see her island paradise.

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Alocasia

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Semi-tropical rhododendron

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Audrey, Kathy, and Gail in front of a row of sweet smelling gardenia bushes

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Gardenia blossoms

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White pineapple plants – the fruit is non-acidic with a soft core so you can eat it too

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Clumping green stripe bamboo and a beautiful lawn.  Kathy does have help from a willing “lawn guy”

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Blue tango bromeliad

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Bat plant

Before you get too impressed by my knowledge of all these plant names, you should know that Kathy is the source.  🙂

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Kathy said that the flowers of this Indonesian red ginger plant are considered “insignificant” because they are close to the ground

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Pachystachys lutea

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Marica Iris

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Common Penta

Hohenbergia stellat (left); Azelas (top right); and Amaranthus (bottom right)

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Azaleas

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Heliconia orthotricha

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Heliconia orthotricha

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Medinilla scortechinii

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There are 3475 known species of bromeliads.  This one is a feather bromeliad.

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Bromeliad

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Kathy showing us blooms of the Aphelandra sinclairiana

The flowers varied in color, shape, texture, and smell.

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Pua keni keni, the perfume flower tree

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Aphelandra sinclairiana

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Semi-tropical rhododendron

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Semi-tropical rhododendron

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Hoya vine

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Kathy with a 25-year-old bromeliad

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Flowers were everywhere – even close to the ground

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Kathy says her anthuriums do best in pots – and hers are spectacular

Medinilla scortechinii (top left);  Gail & Kathy (bottom left)

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Butterfly anthurium

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Candy-striped anthurium

Blossoms of various colors and shapes:

 

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Flowering vine

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African mask plant, Alocasia amazonica – behind a bromeliad

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White orchid

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A zigzag plant – potted in rocks and bark

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Kathy’s nursery – I like the polka-dot plant

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Begonia

Fishtail palm seeds (left);  Bloodleaf (right)

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Heliconia rattle

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Yellow walking iris 

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Acalypha hispida, chenille plant

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Audrey with the George Turnbull bronze eagle in Kathy’s garden

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Heliconia Caribaea

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Bird of Paradise

Beauty was everywhere we looked in Kathy’s garden.

In addition, Kathy’s garden has been the source of many of the ti leaves that have become part of the “Leis of Aloha” – begun in Kihei, Maui,  at  Nalu’s Restaurant and sent around the world as an act of solidarity and love after the tragedies in Paris, Las Vegas, San Bernadino, Orlando, . . . and most recently, with other islands contributing, a 3-mile ti leaf lei was sent to the children in Parkland, Florida.  Such leis have also been created for celebration of the Hawaiian outrigger Hokulea’s return from its three year world-wide voyage – “Malama Honua.”

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Nalu’s Maui ti leaf “Lei of Aloha”   Image from: http://menu-magazine.com/nalus-maui-lei-aloha-world-peace/

Happy Spring.  Enjoy planting – and visiting – gardens wherever you are.

Aloha, Renée

P.S. Banner photo: Obake anthurium

All plant names supplied by Kathy with technical assistance from “the lawn boy”; all photos, except for the ti leaf leis, are by me.  🙂

March for Our Lives – Maui

March 24, 2018 – March and Concert – on Maui – wonderful, hopeful:

The people, the signs, the unity –

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The T-shirt says: “go Vegan & No one gets HURT”

 

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The volunteers –

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A great way to live: “Respect, Empower, Include, Organize”

 

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Volunteer Lucy to the left; Maui Council Woman (and sunflower queen), Kelly King, to the right

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Linette with other voter registration volunteers

After the March for our Lives, we had the Concert for our Lives, Maui style:

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Rachel Zisk, King Kekaulike High School freshman, was one of several articulate, passionate voices that called for us not to forget all the victims of gun violence.  “It is time to come together and demand change.”

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Where’s Barry?  Can you find him?

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U.S. Senator Mazie Hirono

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Maui sent students to Parkland, Florida to bring aloha – and a three-mile ti leaf lei of love and solidarity.

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Following the documentary, “Lei of Aloha,” Kihei Charter School students held up photos of the 17 killed at the Florida school;  Anthony Pfluke sang, “We will rise” and then the Hawaiian chant “E Ala E”

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Maui students including Gita Tucker, Tori Teoh, Skylar Masuda, and ‘Oiwi Gormley spoke powerful messages calling for action.

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With the clipboard, Diana, my student about 15 years ago, was one of those getting people to registered to vote – near the food booths under “mackerel” clouds (Diana taught me that description) at Maui’s Concert for our Lives.

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Representative Tulsi Gabbard – has earned an “F” rating from the National Rifle Association; we are proud of her!

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Uncle Willie K – despite fighting cancer was there to sing and play for us.

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Jack Johnson!  After earlier mass shootings, Jack said he was embarrassed to watch T.V. and see leaders with just “words on their lips.”  This time there is real energy and resolve with the students leading the way.

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Kris Kristofferson, Willie Nelson, Lily Meola, Pat Simmons Jr. were other entertainers in this alcohol/drug-free event

This being Maui, we also saw famous surfers and water people and Hawaiian cultural practitioners.  Ram Dass was there!  Students came to the concert for free.  Adults paid $10 for the fabulous concert.  All the proceeds from the sold-out event will help promote sensible gun- control laws.

Not everyone attending the concert wanted stricter gun laws.  In going around offering forms for voter registration,  I met a man from Alaska who has his assault rifle in his locked gun safe.  He explained that he needed the high-power weapon because of bears and moose.  Wouldn’t a regular rifle offer protection in the unlikely event of an animal attack?  (And then you would be able to eat the meat).   He also tried to explain why he didn’t vote – so he wouldn’t be responsible for voting someone into office that he later found didn’t make good choices.

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Steven Tyler of Aerosmith closed the show with all the performers singing the Beatles” Come Together.   The 5,500 of us in the audience joined in on the chorus: joyful, hope filled.

Why do we desperately need gun change in the U.S.?

Mom’s Demand Action (for gun sense in America) notes a few of those excellent reasons we need change:

  • Every day, 9 3 Americans die from gun violence.
  •  Since Newtown, [the Sandy Hook Elementary School 2012 shooting that killed 20 children between six and seven years old, as well as six adult staff members] there have been over 200 school shootings – one almost every week.
  • American women are 16 times more likely to be shot and killed than women in other developed countries.

The goals:

  • Close the deadly loopholes in our background check system that allow dangerous people like felons and domestic abusers easy access to guns
  • Support reasonable limits on where, when and how loaded guns are carried and used in public
  • Promote gun safety so that America’s children will no longer be exposed to unacceptable level of risk
  • Mobilize popular support for policies that respect Second Amendment rights and protect people

Go to: www.momsdemandaction.org

If you live in the U.S., please Register, Educate Yourself, and then Vote.  If you live in Hawaii, you can check your registration status and/or update your information, by going to: https://olvr.hawaii.gov/.

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The only arms we need – are for hugging.

We can at least get rid of the assault weapons and keep mentally ill and domestic abusers from getting guns legally.  It’s time for positive action.

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Our children are asking for help.  Guns cause senseless killings every day in the U.S. – including “too easy” suicides, too easy  disagreements and domestic abuse incidents  that turn deadly . . .  Even the hate-filled, mentally-ill men who see killing others as an option – need help.

We must take action to stop gun violence in the U.S.

In Peace and Aloha, Renée

Two reef fish in Hawaii – with the most impressive names

One reason I love the State Fish of Hawaii is because of its impressively long name. The Humuhumunukunukuāpua’a  is colorful and beautiful – and if you can say its name quickly, it probably means you’ve lived in Hawaii for a long time and have practiced saying it.  It’s a reef triggerfish, and in Hawaiian, its name means, “”triggerfish with a snout like a pig.”

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The solitary humuhumunukunukupua’a

Image from: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/502432902149516517/

Recently, I learned that there is another fish here in our waters with an even longer Hawaiian name: the lauwiliwill nukunuku ‘oi’oi.

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The common English name is “forcepsfish”; the Hawaiian name lauwiliwill nukunuku ‘oi’oi

Image from: http://www.botany.hawaii.edu/basch/uhnpscesu/htms/kalafish/fish_pops/chaetond/butterfly14.htm

In “Lauwiliwill nukunuku ‘oi’oi – A small fish with a big name,” Evan Pascual notes in a recent Maui News article, “Lauwiliwili refers to the similarity between the shape of the fish’s body and the wiliwili tree’s leaf, which is oval in shape and turns yellow as it ages.

Nukunuku (snout) and ‘oi’oi (sharp) describe the fish’s narrow, elongated mouth.  Together, it loosely translates as ‘long-snout fish shaped like a wiliwili leaf.’

There are two species of longnose butterflyfish in Hawaii: The common longnose butterflyfish (Forcipiger flavissimus) and the big longnose butterflyfish (Forcipiger Iongirosis).  They share the same Hawaiian name, stunning yellow coloration, elongated mouth and flaring dorsal spines. Their sleek, flat-shaped bodies allow them to quickly maneuver between corals while their sharp spines protect them from predators.

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Big longnose butterflyfish (Forcipiger longirosis)

Image from: https://www.waikikiaquarium.org/experience/animal-guide/fishes/butterflyfishes/longnose-butterflyfish/

Nearly identical in appearance, the common longnose butterfly has a much shorter mouth than the big longnose butterflyfish.  Their beaklike mouths are used to probe corals and reef crevices in search of small invertebrates and crustaceans, but are also used in cleaning stations to remove crustacean parasites from their fellow reef fish.

Another difference between the two species is their main habitat.  The common longnose butterflyfish lives in shallow water environments throughout the Hawaiian Islands and is more visible to snorkelers.  However, the big longnose butterflyfish is rarely seen as it lives in deep-water environments beyond coral reefs, most notably off the Kona Coast of the Big Island.

The lauwiliwili nukunuku ‘oi’oi has a unique and perhaps lesser-known history in Hawaii.  The British explorer Capt. James Cook embarked on a Pacific-voyage 1776-80 where he and his crew would become the first Europeans to encounter the Hawaiian Islands.  During this expedition, which included documenting scientific observations, the big longnose butterflyfish is believed to have been the first Hawaiian marine species to be collected and identified by an English scientist.

In more recent years, over 55,000 public votes were cast in 1984 to name the Sate of Hawaii’s official fish.  The lauwiliwili nukunuku ‘oi’oi finished in third place following a narrow defeat by the manini (convict tang) and a landslide victory by the humuhumunukunuapua’a.  Today, it remains as a living testament to the beauty and wonder of Hawaii’s reef fishes.

At the Maui Ocean Center, a few common longnose butterflyfish peacefully swim alongside other reef fishes in the Living Reef exhibits.  When we look at a coral reef, whether at the aquarium or in the waters surrounding Maui, we often see a single image of a living community rather than the individual species that make up this brilliant seascape.  But if you look closely, every animal has a unique role, a connection to local culture, a lesser-known history, and in the case of the lauwiliwili nukunuku ‘oi’oi, a really, really interesting name…”

From: The Maui News, March 4, 2018, C2.

Another interesting fact about the lauwiliwili nukunuku ‘oi’oi is that the Waikīkī Aquarium adopted the longnose butterflyfish as its logo – as it represents a meeting and common interest in the marine environment by both Hawaiian and European naturalists.

Take a close look at the animals wherever you live; you are likely to find interesting facts and have more appreciation of each one.

Aloha, Renée

 

 

 

Thoughts and Actions: Let them spring from love

War or Peace?

On Saturday, January 13, my husband Barry, our friend Gail from Washington State, and I lounged on our lanai on the warm Maui morning.  We  watched the birds congregate at our feeder: lots of little red beaked Java sparrows, vibrantly colored love birds, red-headed finches, and an occasional Hawaiian cardinal.

 

As we sipped our coffee, chatted, and laughed, a warning alert blared from my phone.  Usually this means a flash flood warning from rain storms up country or a high-surf advisory.  Not at all concerned, I strolled into the kitchen to pick up my phone:

I read:

“BALLISTIC  MISSILE THREAT INBOUND TO HAWAII. SEEK IMMEDIATE SHELTER. THIS IS NOT A DRILL.”

Wow!!

Was this it?

In the three seconds that it took for me to run back outside to where Barry and Gail were chatting, the following thoughts (in abbreviated form) raced through my mind:

1) Where could we take shelter?   We live in a house of single-wall construction, with lots of windows, set on posts and pilings attached to volcanic rock.  We don’t even have basements in Hawaii let alone bomb shelters.   For a short while during the 1960s when everyone in the U.S. was afraid the Russians would attack, my dad – as a part-time job – sold home bomb shelters that could be built in your backyard.  But that was in the Midwest and a long time ago. (I don’t think Dad sold many, and we certainly couldn’t afford one).  At school, we practiced crouching under our desks as a way to be protected from atomic bombs!!   Ridiculous!

2) I’ve read Japanese author Masuji Ibuse’s Black Rain, a dispassionate but memorable novel based on historical records of the devastation caused by the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and those who survived.  I’ve been to Hiroshima and  the Peace Museum there where  photos show that  people were vaporized by bombs much smaller than the ones available today.

hiroshima-a-bomb-effects

Photos of the Prefectural Industrial Promotion Building before (inset) and after the bombing of Hiroshima – now known as the Peace Dome, the Atomic Bomb Dome, or A-Bomb Dome (原爆ドーム Genbaku Dōmu)).  It  is part of the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park in Hiroshima, Japan and a UNESCO World Heritage.

From:

https://diogenesii.files.wordpress.com/2014/08/hiroshima-a-bomb-effects.png

The report from the first Western journalist to enter Hiroshima after the bombing notes –

On September 3, 1945, “Wilfred Graham Burchett entered Hiroshima alone, less than a month after the atomic bombing of the city. He was the first Western journalist — and almost certainly the first Westerner other than prisoners of war — to reach Hiroshima after the bomb and was the only person to get an uncensored story out of Japan. The story which he typed out on his battered Baby Hermes typewriter, sitting among the ruins, remains one of the most important Western eyewitness accounts, and the first attempt to come to terms with the full human and moral consequences of the United States’ initiation of nuclear war. It was published in the London Daily Express on September 5 and appears below . . .:

30th Day in Hiroshima: Those who escaped begin to die, victims of
THE ATOMIC PLAGUE
I write this as a Warning to the World
DOCTORS FALL AS THEY WORK
Poison gas fear: All wear masks

In Hiroshima, 30 days after the 1st atomic bomb destroyed the city and shook the world, people are still dying, mysteriously and horribly — people who were uninjured in the cataclysm from an unknown something which I can only describe as the atomic plague.

Hiroshima does not look like a bombed city. It looks as if a monster steamroller has passed over it and squashed it out of existence. I write these facts as dispassionately as I can in the hope that they will act as a warning to the world.

In this first testing ground of the atomic bomb I have seen the most terrible and frightening desolation in four years of war. It makes a blitzed Pacific island seem like an Eden. The damage is far greater than photographs can show.

When you arrive in Hiroshima you can look around for twenty-five and perhaps thirty square miles and you can see hardly a building. It gives you an empty feeling in the stomach to see such man-made destruction.

I picked my way to a shack used as a temporary police headquarters in the middle of the vanished city. Looking south from there I could see about three miles of reddish rubble. That is all the atomic bomb left of dozens of blocks of city streets, of buildings, homes, factories and human beings.

STILL THEY FAIL

There is just nothing standing except about twenty factory chimneys — chimneys with no factories. A group of half a dozen gutted buildings. And then again, nothing.

The police chief of Hiroshima welcomed me eagerly as the first Allied correspondent to reach the city. With the local manager of Domei, the leading Japanese news agency, he drove me through, or perhaps I should say over, the city. And he took me to hospitals where the victims of the bomb are still being treated.

In these hospitals I found people who, when the bomb fell suffered absolutely no injuries, but now are dying from the uncanny after-effects. For no apparent reason their health began to fail. They lost appetite. Their hair fell out. Bluish spots appeared on their bodies. And then bleeding began from the ears, nose, and mouth. At first, the doctors told me, they thought these were the symptoms of general debility. They gave their patients Vitamin A injections. The results were horrible. The flesh started rotting away from the hole caused by the injection of the needle. And in every case the victim died. That is one of the after-effects of the first atomic bomb man ever dropped and I do not want to see any more examples of it. . . .

 

From:   https://diogenesii.wordpress.com/tag/hiroshima/

Go to the above link for the rest of the article.

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In the Oct. 10,  2016, Popular Mechanics article, Jay Bennett writes:

Here’s How Much Deadlier Today’s Nukes Are Compared to WWII A-Bombs

“With so much at stake, it’s important to understand what these things are capable of.

The atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki at the end of World War II—codenamed “Little Boy” and “Fat Man,” respectively—caused widespread destruction, leveled cities, and killed between 90,000 and 166,000 people in Hiroshima (about 20,000 of which were soldiers), and between 39,000 and 80,000 in Nagasaki. These are the only two nuclear weapons ever used in warfare, and let’s hope it stays that way, because some of the nuclear weapons today are more than 3,000 times as powerful as the bomb dropped on Hiroshima.”

Also,  for those surviving the initial bombing, the radiation sickness caused agonizing deaths.  (Also, the birth defects that follow the family of the survivors reach into  subsequent generations).

3) I would not want to survive an atomic blast.

4) Even if I did somehow survive the blast, there would be huge problems in Hawaii.  Although the Hawaiians were self-sustaining for thousands of years, now “modern” Hawaii imports 90-95% of its food and energy.  We are one of the most food vulnerable places on Earth.  If there were a catastrophe, we would soon be out of food and fuel.  Puerto Rico is still not getting needed help from the devastation caused by Hurricane Maria on September 20, 2017.

In a December 21, 2017 article for Esquire magazine,

Holms reports, It’s been “three months since Hurricane Maria made landfall in Puerto Rico, unleashing the full force of a Category 4 storm on the American territory. The intensity of the 155 mile-per-hour winds and the ferocity of the rainfall led the island’s residents to believe they had encountered something not of this world. . .

The troubles were never going to recede with the storm. The recovery was always going to be long, hard, and frustrating. But reports on the ground in the ensuing weeks quickly made it clear that the federal government’s effort was unacceptably slow and perilously inept. One month after the storm, one million Puerto Ricans—American citizens—were without water. Three million were without power.”

From: http://www.esquire.com/news-politics/a14474788/puerto-rico-3-months-after-hurricane/

Puerto Rico is much closer to the Mainland U.S. than we are; we aren’t likely to get much help from our current administration.

5) Where was President Trump – and what was he doing with his “bigger button”?

Such terrifying thoughts raced through my mind as I ran back outside to alert Barry and Gail.

Gail, being the smart Microsoft contractor that she is, immediately opened her computer and checked The New York Times.   Lead stories included one on the U.S. economy and one on gay rights.  There was nothing about missiles headed toward Hawaii.  Barry, the always great researcher, ran to the kitchen and turned on the radio.  There was nothing on any channel.  There were no continuing disaster sirens.

We decided the alert had been a hoax or a hack.

Besides, we were with people we loved, watching birds, and drinking coffee. Our neighbor came up with his cup of coffee.  Our other lovely neighbor was off paddling in the ocean.  Our son and his little family were on the U.S. Mainland.  If we were to go, it would be quick – and besides the crisis didn’t seem real.

Another alarm signal came 38 minutes later saying the first had been a mistake.  Later we learned that our president had been playing golf in Florida, so he didn’t overreact to the “news.”  The whole situation reminded us that we must check our sources, but it also reminded us that we haven’t really worried about nuclear threats since the early 60s.

At home on our lanai, our little gathering did have a heightened sense of appreciation for the beautiful day, our relationships, our lives, and we poured another round of coffee.

A few days later, the following letter (written by my friend Melinda whom I’ve known for about 20 years) was published in The Maui News:

Nuclear war is neither acceptable nor inevitable

Stop the Nuclear Attack Warning System; it deceives people into believing there is something they can do to protect themselves. There isn’t.

 

As an interviewer and researcher who lived in Hiroshima for over 10 years, I learned that any survival is a fluke. The small bombs that were detonated in Japan vaporized people in an instant, leaving only their shadows. Skin melted off, neighborhoods disappeared, people who were in shelters were sucked out by an intense force and those who survived for a while died horrific deaths from radiation poisoning.

The warning signal is a cruel lie. Nuclear war is neither acceptable nor inevitable.

Did you know that in 1929 a law was passed making war illegal? It’s called the Kellogg Brian Pact. It was put forth by our secretary of state, Frank B. Kellogg, and his French counterpart, Aristide Briand.

Did you also know that Hawaii is the first state to recognize the KBP law thanks to Mayor Alan Arakawa’s signing a proclamation making Aug. 27 KBP day? And that Gov. David Ige recognized KBP in a Peace Day proclamation at the Nisei Veterans Memorial Center in September?

Instead of sirens we need to find a way to de-escalate the path toward nuclear war. Could it be through legal action such as fines for incitement since KBP outlaws war?

If the Koreas and USA can negotiate a cease-fire, surely we citizens of aloha can find a way to prepare for “No More War.”

Melinda Clarke

****

GetAttachmentThumbnail-10

At the Maui Women’s March, January 20, 2018, – UH Maui College

Surely, we can all work for peace and toward peace.

Religious leaders of all faiths advise peace and love:

Prophet Muhammad, said : “None of you have faith until you love for your neighbor what you love for yourself” (Sahih Muslim)

from: http://quraan-today.blogspot.com/2014/01/golden-rule-in-islam-treat-others-as.html

The wise words of Buddha from the Dhammapada  further reminds us where we could be putting our thoughts – and actions:

 

The thought manifests as the word;

  The word manifests as the deed;

  The deed develops into habit;

  And habit hardens into character.

  So watch the thought and its way with care and let it spring from 

  love, born out of concern for all beings.”

  –The Buddha

Gandhi said, “The real love is to love them that hate you, to love your neighbor even though you distrust him. Non-violence requires a double faith, faith in God and also faith in man. I object to violence because when it appears to do good, the good is only temporary; the evil it does is permanent. . . .

quote-when-i-despair-i-remember-that-all-through-history-the-ways-of-truth-and-love-have-always-won-mahatma-gandhi-283137

From: http://izquotes.com/quotes-pictures/quote-when-i-despair-i-remember-that-all-through-history-the-ways-of-truth-and-love-have-always-won-mahatma-gandhi-283137.jpg

And what did Jesus say? “Love thy neighbor as thyself.”

Let’s put our focus and energy on understanding and loving everyone.   Our survival and that of the Earth depends on it.

Aloha,

Renée

Banner photo:  Birds in the papaya tree off our lanai

Mrs. Weidman’s 2nd graders in Effingham, IL want to know about Hawaii

One of the highlights of our recent U.S. road trip was stopping at my cousin Elaine’s in Effingham, IL.  Her grandson, Keegan, a 2nd grader, is in an elementary school that has  for the past 28 years been doing a unit on Hawaii.

Keegan-

Keegan in Casey, IL – “A Small Town with a Big Heart”

Since Barry and I were going to be in town, we were invited to answer their questions about our island home.

hawaiian-islands-in-the-Pacific

1) Since it is so far away from the rest of the United States, why is Hawaii a state?

Hawaii is far away from Mainland U.S. A. – that is true.

  • From California to Hawaii is 2,471 miles.
  • From Japan to Hawaii is 4,980 miles away.

Before it was a U.S. possession, Hawaii was an independent country.   However on Jan. 17, 1893, Hawaii’s monarchy was overthrown by a group of U.S. businessmen and sugar planters (who wanted to make more money).  With the help of U.S. military, the business people forced Queen Liliuokalani, the Queen of the Kingdom of Hawaii, to abdicate.  She give up her rights and kingdom although she was the rightful leader. She didn’t want her people killed.

Queen-Liliuokalani

Queen Liliuokalani

Two years later, Hawaii was annexed as a U.S. territory and eventual admitted in 1959 as the 50th state in the union.

2) What races live in Hawaii?

  • The state’s overall racial breakdown: white, 22.7%; black or African American, 1.5%; American Indian and Alaska Native, 0.2%; Asian, 37.7%; Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander, 9.4%. The Hispanic or Latino population, of any race, was 8.9%.

Hawaiian-ohana

Ohana – family in Hawaii

3) Have you seen a volcano erupt?

  • Yes, on the Big Island of Hawaii many years ago, Barry and I saw a volcano erupting!
  • Lava and steam have been coming up in various places on the Big Island for many years. Johnny and Sigrid were just there in February and were right by extremely hot, slowly flowing lava.
  • On Maui, we have two volcanoes – one extinct (dead) and one dormant (sleeping), so we don’t have lava flows now.
  • The Hawaiian islands were formed by volcanoes.

Types-of-lava-flows

Types of lava flows – from: <http://www.sandatlas.org/types-lava-flows/&gt;

Big Island Kilauea Volcano

Go to this link to see molten lava:

<https://www.theguardian.com/world/video/2015/aug/28/lava-hawaiis-kilauea-volcano-video?subject=Big Island Volcano>

4) What are the black sand beaches like?

  • Black sand is hot – very hot when the noon sun shines upon it.
  • The dark color absorbs the sunlight, so if your feet are bare, you have to run really quickly to get into the water.
  • That sand is black because it is fine particles of volcanic rock.
  • Most sand in Hawaii is silicon dioxide (quartz) that is white or whitish yellow; it has been broken down from rocks and minerals by wind, rain and freezing/thawing cycles into smaller grains. In a few places, the sand is red.
  • Also, sea creatures such as the parrot fish chew up minerals and leave sand behind.

green-sea-turtle

Green sea turtle – you can find them in shallow waters

5) What is the weather like?

  • Nice   – highs are around 87 degrees in June, July, and August and lows of about 64 degrees are in January and February.
  • Because temperatures drop about 3.2F (1.3C) every 1,000 feet (305m), the summit of Haleakala is roughly 32F (13C) cooler than the beaches.
  • Rainfall is low in Kihei (10 inches a year), but on the east of Maui, is Hana, a rain forest (400 inches a year).
  • Hawaii is called a “tropical paradise” because its climate makes people feel comfortable almost every day of the year.

6) Are there a lot of shark sightings?

  • No. Sharks do live in the ocean, but they aren’t often seen here in Hawaii.  One thousand miles south of the Hawaiian Islands, in the Palmyra Atoll, however, there are about 20 sharks every half mile.  So it depends where you are what sea life you’ll find.
  • About three shark attacks occur per year in Hawaii. Few shark attacks are fatal.  Sharks do not have very good eyesight, so it is best to stay out of the ocean at dawn, dusk, or at times when the water is murky.  Sharks are looking for turtles to eat – not humans.
  • The Hawaii shark attack rate is surprisingly low considering the thousands of people who swim, surf, and dive in Hawaiian waters every day.
  • The most frequently encountered Hawaiian reef sharks are the White Tipped Reef Shark, Scalloped Hammerhead Shark, Tiger Shark, Galapagos Shark, Gray Reef Shark, and the Sandbar Shark.

7) Do people really do the hula?

huladancers

lhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Xr1Wd17w-g

  • Yes, the men and women – and children – dance hula. The Hawaiians have a powerful dance, music, and chant culture!

8) How is Christmas celebrated in Hawaii?

  • Over half the people in Hawaii practice Christianity.
  • Of those, 18.74% are Catholic; 5.24% are LDS; 3.91% are another Christian faith; 0.06% in Hawaii are Jewish; 5.14% are an eastern faith; 0.05% Islam.
  • Barry and I have a Christmas tree, church services, and celebrations with our families.   Because the weather is warm, we take food and spend our Christmas Day at the beach with our friends and family.
  • Because we live in Hawaii, we get to enjoy and experience other cultures and religions that our friends and neighbors practice.

On Maui – Santa arrives by canoe

Christmas-santa

9) Are there any interesting animals on Maui?

  • Yes. Many – many – especially sea creatures.
  • My favorite one? Humpback whales that come to Hawaii from about December through February.

humpback-whale

Humpback Whale – breaching.  Scientists still have much to learn about whales.

Humpback Whale Facts:

  • Whales are mammals: breathe air, warm blooded, live birth, have hair, & mom’s produce milk.
  • Fifty-eight million years ago, whales were land animals.  But there was global warming and less land and food, so the whales evolved back into sea creatures.
  • Their trip from Alaska to Hawaii (and then back to Alaska) takes whales 5 to 7 weeks at 3 to 8 miles per hour – each way!  It’s about 3,000 miles they swim to give birth and mate in our shallow, sandy bottom, warm water.
  • A whale calf is 15 foot at birth and drinks about 120 pounds of milk per day.
  • Because their throats are about the size of a grapefruit, the Humpback whales don’t eat for about four months here because our fish are too big.  The whales have to wait until they get back to Alaska where there is krill,  small shrimp and other small cold water fish for them to eat!
  • All whales vocalize, but the males “sing.” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xo2bVbDtiX8
  • Life span: 40-80 years
  • Length: 35-45 feet
  • Weight 35-45 tons ( 1 ton = 2,000 pounds)
  • Importance of whales to microscopic beings: Scientists report that when whales feed, often at great depths, and then return to the surface to breathe, they mix up the water column. That spreads nutrients and microorganisms through different marine zones, which can lead to feeding bonanzas for other creatures.
  • And the materials in whale urine and excrement, especially iron and nitrogen, serve as effective fertilizers for plankton.

Come visit us to see other animals, birds, and sea life.

10) Do you have turtles in Hawaii?

  • Two kinds you’ll find in Hawaii (among others) are the Green Sea turtle and the endangered Hawksbill.
  • At Ho’okipa Beach on Maui, you can sometimes see 25 or more turtles, big and small, basking – resting and warming up – on shore every afternoon.
  • Thirty years ago, basking seldom happened. But now, turtles are protected. It’s against the law to eat them.

big-turtle

Some turtles can weigh 300 pounds

 

hawksbill-2

Hawksbill

turtles-Ho'okipa

Basking turtles at Ho’okipa Beach Park

hawksbillexcavationwaiting

Waiting for the excavation of a Hawksbill turtle nest. Because the Hawksbills are very endangered, volunteers guard their nests from dogs, mongoose, other people . . . If the turtles don’t hatch in a timely way, scientists come to help them get out to the ocean.

hawksbill-babies

Hawksbill turtles emerging from their nest.  Each is about the size of a U.S. quarter.

We have other much more common animals:

lovebirds

Lovebirds come to our bird feeder every day.

mango-sarah

Mango is a myna bird that Johnny rescued when she fell from her nest.

11) What can you do for fun?

Windsurfing

Windsurf on Maui

H---jump

Watch what the locals do before you jump.

Ho'okipa

You can surf, kite sail, windsurf, swim, canoe, . . . in the Pacific Ocean.

waterfall

Hike to waterfalls

rainbow.gif

Watch for rainbows.  See the faint second one here?

flowers-orange

Look for beautiful plants and flowers

Maui-Sunflowers

See sunflowers growing on Maui – an experiment to see what can replace the sugar cane that has been growing here for about 140 years.

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Learn how to climb a coconut tree – and make coconut milk and coconut cookies.

And of course, you must come paddle Hawaiian outrigger canoe with me.  Kihei Canoe Club has visitor paddle every Tuesday and Thursday.  Be on the beach by 7:15 am.  You will learn the basics of paddling, hear a bit of Hawaiian culture (especially if Uncle Kimokea is there), and get to be on the ocean with experienced paddlers.  We never know what we will see.   http://www.kiheicanoeclub.com/

Kihei-Canoe-Club-copy

As for our time in Effingham, Barry and I had a very good time meeting Keegan’s classmates and teachers – and answering their excellent questions.

Mrs-W's-class

Keegan’s classmates in Effingham, IL

Mrs

Cousin Elaine brought juice and made “Hawaiian” cookies with macadamia nuts and coconuts.  We all had a good time.

Of course, there is much more to say about the Hawaiian Islands.  Come visit and see for yourself.

Aloha, Renée

NaluKai

Nalu and Kailani looking for adventure. You come too.

kbs-aloha

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hawaii for Keegan417

 

 

 

Thought for the Day: Our Farmers

Since President Abraham Lincoln declared it a national holiday in 1863, those of us in the United States have been celebrating Thanksgiving  Day on the final Thursday in November.   We give thanks and count our many blessings – and usually eat too much with family and friends.

pumpkin1

One important blessing is our many farmers who provide the food we eat.

A way to become more conscious and make more informed choices about the food we have offered is to get to know our local farmers and their concerns.

 

If you live in Hawaii, a great way to do that is to join the Hawaii HFUU 2016 colored w microns Farmers Union United, a vital community group.  Whether you are a family  farmer, an avid backyard gardener, or just like to know where you can get good local produce, HFUU offers wonderful workshops, informative meetings, and works on important agricultural concerns.

For more information and to join, go to: https://hfuuhi.org/

Current President of Maui Farmers Union United and Vice President of Hawaii State Farmers Union United, Vincent Mina says about the challenges of farming (and everything else),

“If you do anything substantive, it will be hard.  Just get on with it.”

vincentmina-newphoto

Vincent Mina – from the HFUU home page.

Wherever you are in the world, check out what your farmers are doing.   “Get on with it.”

Happy Thanksgiving to you and your family — and all who provide for you.

Aloha, Renée

 

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