Yulong River Bamboo Rafting, Yangshou, China

A great way to spend a few hours near Yangshou, Yunnan Province, China,  is to take a bamboo raft down the Yulong River.  That is what Barry and I did one overcast but mild November afternoon.

Bamboo raft embarcation

Bamboo raft embarcation

 

Karsts along the Yulong River

Karsts along the Yulong River

A cloudy afternoon on the Yulong River

A cloudy afternoon on the Yulong River

Reflections on the Yulong River

Reflections on the Yulong River

Quiet and fantastic karats

Quiet and fantastic karats

Our bamboo raft guide

Our bamboo raft guide

Clouds and karsts

Clouds and karsts

One karst more beautiful than the next

One karst more beautiful than the next

Ducks on the Yulong River

Ducks on the Yulong River

Bikers along the bank of the Yulong River

Bikers along the bank of the Yulong River

Clean water

Clean water

Going over a little rapid

Going over a little rapid

Occasionally, we saw some construction along the banks of the Yulong.

Occasionally, we saw some construction along the banks of the Yulong.

 

The construction didn't really interfere with the views.

The construction didn’t really interfere with the views.

We heard and saw birds along the river.

We heard and saw birds along the river.

Barry and a huge karst.

Barry and a huge karst.

Another rapids drop

Another rapids drop

Clear water all along our bamboo raft trip.

Clear water all along our bamboo raft trip.

Bananas and orchid trees along the banks of the Yulong.

Bananas and orchid trees along the banks of the Yulong.

Bananas and orchid trees along the banks of the Yulong.

Bananas and orchid trees along the banks of the Yulong.

Other rafters ahead

Other rafters ahead.

The karats vary in form and size.

The karats vary in form and size.

Along the banks, a couple set up for their wedding photos.

Along the banks, a couple set up for their wedding photos.

Fellow rafters

Fellow rafters

You can see why rock climbing is popular here.

You can see why rock climbing is popular here.

Captured "working" cormorants.

Captured “working” cormorants on the banks of the Yulong.

The fisherman and his cormorants.

The fisherman and his cormorants.

This rafter brought her bike on the along.

This rafter brought her bike on the along.

A camel and two monkeys waited on the bank for photo opportunities.

A camel and two monkeys waited on the bank for photo opportunities.

Barry and I had a great, relaxing afternoon on the Yulong River.  You would like it here too.

Aloha &  Zaì jiàn, Renée

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About reneeriley

Our blog was begun as a way to share our experiences in China. From August 2010 to July 2011, my husband, Barry Kristel, and I were at our University of Hawaii Maui College sister school, Zhejiang Agriculture and Forestry University in Lin'an, China, a city considered rural because it has only 500,000 people! We had a wonderful time. Then in February 2012, we returned to teach this time at our other sister school, Shanghai Normal University, in a city of over 21 million people. We've made many discoveries. Did you know that now Chinese girls, at least the ones who go to university, for the most part feel they are luckier than the Chinese boys? Did you know that Shanghai saved over 20,000 European Jews during WWII? Do you know how Chinese university students would deal with problems that come up in Dear Abby letters? What's it like to be on the Great Wall of China? Do you know how many Chinese girls had their feet bound and why? And we have recipes from many of the places we've visited. Among others, you can find instructions on how to fry cicadas from one of my ZAFU students and how to make chocolate-Kahlua waffles from my brother Mike in Gainesville. You can also look back to our earliest entry to see what we experienced in Oaxaca, Mexico, in 2006 during the mainly peaceful six months of protest until the Mexican government sent in the troops. Between our stays in China, Barry and I have been on the Mainland U.S. visiting family, friends and Servas hosts as we traveled home to Maui. We share those experiences too. Welcome to our blog! Aloha and Zài Jiàn, Renée and Barry

One response to “Yulong River Bamboo Rafting, Yangshou, China”

  1. Pat says :

    Karst is a new word for me. Not likely to be needing it to describe formations but more helpful as scrabble use of letter k

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