Supermarkets in China – Now

I’ve read that some people coming from Third World Countries are amazed by our U.S. supermarkets with their rows and rows of pet food, cereals, and all manner of consumable products.  Where can you find such aisles now?

P1030170 A full aisle of toothpastes, tooth brushes, and other dental aids.  Five years ago, we had a hard time finding dental floss in Lin’an, China.

P1030174                                                                       The Cereal Aisle

An Imported Products aisle

An Imported Products aisle

Packaged Food

Packaged Food

 

For your pets too.

For your pets too.

A wall of pet food.

A wall of pet food.

Some sections could be in a U.S. market:

Fresh lettuces

Fresh lettuces

Fresh breads

Fresh breads

Crisp fall apples!

Crisp fall apples!

Wines from Australia

Wines from Australia – and beyond

Budweiser - here an imported beer

Budweiser – here an imported beer

Local beer - under 50 cents a bottle

Local beer – under 50 cents U.S. a bottle

However, in some sections, we know we are in China.   Here’s Barry in the tea aisle.

Many choices of tea.

Many choices of tea.

More teas

More teas

The dried fish section.

The dried fish section.

Fresh fish

Fresh fish

The meats

The meats

Chicken

The chickens

Rices

Rices

Prepared foods

Prepared foods

Prepared salads

Prepared salads

We recognized some “street food” in a prepared foods section.  Although we have never gotten sick by eating street food here, we figured it might be safer to buy in the supermarket than on the street.  So we picked out a few things.  Too late, Barry realized that one of the choices  – a pork stuffed wanton was – not cooked!  Yikes.  We’re back to the streets.

Many, many aisles of packaged foods

Many, many aisles of packaged foods

Packaged foods galore!

Packaged foods galore!

The abundant packaged foods and the ubiquitous fast-food restaurants are leading some Chinese to make unhealthy choices.

McDonald's in Shanghai

McDonald’s in Shanghai – and he’s smoking 😦

And just so you don’t think that China just seems ordinary like another U.S. city, I’ll add this.  A day when Barry and I had just been in the Shanghai Carrefour Supermarket and were walking back to our hotel, we passed a hutong, an old traditional neighborhood.  We saw a crowd of people huddled over something on the ground across the street.  I had to go look.  I hoped it wasn’t a dog.

Goat on the street

Fresh meat on the street

It was a goat being cut up!  The U.S. Department would not approve of a curb-side butcher.

However, we learned on the news that night that Muslims were celebrating Eid Al-Adha, “The Festival of the Sacrifice.”   A part of that tradition is to give charity; they are to sacrifice an animal and distribute its meat among family, friends, and the poor.  So what we had seen was an act of giving; the people from the hutong who received the meat must have been happy and grateful.

So when you come to China, you won’t be very surprised by their supermarkets.  However, you are likely to find surprises on the streets.

Zài Jiàn and Aloha, Renée

 

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About reneeriley

Our blog was begun as a way to share our experiences in China. From August 2010 to July 2011, my husband, Barry Kristel, and I were at our University of Hawaii Maui College sister school, Zhejiang Agriculture and Forestry University in Lin'an, China, a city considered rural because it has only 500,000 people! We had a wonderful time. Then in February 2012, we returned to teach this time at our other sister school, Shanghai Normal University, in a city of over 21 million people. We've made many discoveries. Did you know that now Chinese girls, at least the ones who go to university, for the most part feel they are luckier than the Chinese boys? Did you know that Shanghai saved over 20,000 European Jews during WWII? Do you know how Chinese university students would deal with problems that come up in Dear Abby letters? What's it like to be on the Great Wall of China? Do you know how many Chinese girls had their feet bound and why? And we have recipes from many of the places we've visited. Among others, you can find instructions on how to fry cicadas from one of my ZAFU students and how to make chocolate-Kahlua waffles from my brother Mike in Gainesville. You can also look back to our earliest entry to see what we experienced in Oaxaca, Mexico, in 2006 during the mainly peaceful six months of protest until the Mexican government sent in the troops. Between our stays in China, Barry and I have been on the Mainland U.S. visiting family, friends and Servas hosts as we traveled home to Maui. We share those experiences too. Welcome to our blog! Aloha and Zài Jiàn, Renée and Barry

2 responses to “Supermarkets in China – Now”

  1. patricia rouse says :

    Nice going, Renee, you feed my armchair travel needs. I’m glad you are there and not me.

    Kihei had rain all night from the off shore storm, thunder and lightening preceding, what fun! No power out and the morning has arrived. We are well irrigated. Love to you, Pat

  2. reneeriley says :

    Hi Pat: I’m glad you’re safe. The Kihei plants are sure to love the rain. “Hi” to everyone there. Aloha, Renee

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