Flat Stanley is on Maui!

Flat Stanley - the book

Flat Stanley, according to the book, is a resourceful boy.  After a bulletin board hung over his bed falls and unfortunately flattens him, Stanley started traveling the world (since he can easily fit  in an envelop, which saves a lot on air fare).  He makes the best of his difficult situation.

My great-nephew, Bryce, who is in 4th grade, mailed Flat Stanley to me, and I have been showing him Maui.

Here is  Flat Stanley’s  report to Bryce and his class.

One of the first places Flat Stanley saw was Tasty Crust.

Locals on Maui love Tasty Crust especially for breakfast

Uncle Barry, Flat Stanley, and tasty pancakes

Not too far away from Tasty Crust is Iao Valley.  Locals go to Iao to swim in the cold water; tourists go to see the waterfalls and replica houses of  the many ethnic groups who live here on Maui: Hawaiian, Filipino, Korean, Chinese, Japanese, Portuguese, and Western missionary.

Flat Stanley in one of the many huge banyan trees in Iao Valley

Flat Stanley with a stone lion in Iao Valley Heritage Park

Flat Stanley and cousin John: The Iao streams are not only great for cooling off on a hot day but also a source of clean water

Hiking is great on Maui.

At Iao Needle, hiking with John and Nalu.

John let Flat Stanley ride piggy back for the Iao Valley hike

Flat Stanley at the Iao Tablelands

Flat Stanley and a rainbow. We did get a little wet. It's a good thing that Bryce laminated Flat Stanley

Of course, you probably know that Maui is famous for its beaches.  Maui has been voted  “Best Island in the World” by Conte Nash Traveler  readers for 17 years, so of course, Flat Stanley wanted to see the Pacific Ocean.  Maui is about 3,000 miles from any continent, so there is a lot of ocean around it.  Look on a map to see how far Hawaii is from the rest of the U.S. mainland and from Asia too.

 

Do you see Maui? (map from The Lonely Planet)

Map from: http://www.mapquest.com/embed?hk=w0vu39   <http://mapq.st/w0vu39&gt;

Many people love to come to Maui especially in the winter. The sand is soft, the ocean warm. Many couples come for their honeymoons.

Justin, Jade, and a little friend blowing bubbles on the Kam III Maui beach

Of course, Flat Stanley wanted to see a Maui sunset.

Maui sunset

On another day, we rode upcountry (up the side of Haleakala, the volcano) and saw ranches and farms.

Flat Stanley on the pumpkin wagon at Kula Farms

Flat Stanley spotted a very creative mailbox.

Upcountry mailbox

Flat Stanley has come with us, of course,  to celebrate a few holidays.  As usual, for instance, we went to the beach for our Thanksgiving dinner with friends.

Thanksgiving at Kam III

Another day, we hiked the Maui Coastal Land Trust preserve.   http://www.mauicoastallandtrust.org/ourwork.php

The Maui Coastal Land Trust manager, Flat Stanley, Aunt Renée & good friend Pat

When we drove upcountry one Sunday to join our Quaker Friends in Eve’s Sacred Garden,  Flat Stanley came too.

Flowers, birds chirping, a bubbling stream: a peaceful setting for meditation. Flat Stanley with Buddha

Flat Stanley comes to gatherings with friends.

Good friend Denise at her birthday party

Although 90% of our food and energy are imported  from at least 3,000 miles away–so we really need to work on sustainability–we do have good locally grown fresh food.

Tasty greens from our garden--with a heart-shaped grilled potato slice. Flat Stanley doesn't eat much, but he knows to eat fruits and vegetables.

Because the temperatures are very moderate on Maui,  we feel it is winter when it rains–especially in Kihei where we live.

At sea level where we live, the temperature doesn't usually get below 60 degrees even in the winter.

Sometimes we can see even double rainbows--see the one forming on the right?

Since you go to a Catholic school, you might be interested in the churches here on Maui.    The missionaries had a big impact on the culture and religion of the Hawaiians.

Keanae Congregational Church--Built of lava rocks, this one was established in 1857

The church  was the only Keanae building to survive the devastating tsunami of April 1, 1946.

Another interesting church is the octagon-sided Holy Ghost Catholic Church upcountry in  Kula; it was built in 1875 by Portuguese immigrants who had come to work on the Maui sugar cane plantations.

Holy Ghost Catholic Church & cemetery

photo by http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holy_Ghost_Catholic_Church_(Kula,_Hawaii)

Stanley wanted to see more of Maui, so we drove to Hana with friends.  The road crosses 52 one-lane bridges through rain forests.  The area is one of the wettest places on Earth.

Shanghai interns Elaine, Jasmine, Stacey, & Yvonne with Flat Stanley near a roadside waterfall

Hana town

Many tourists rush to get to Hana, but as with life, it is the journey that is important.  We stopped to eat lunch and hike at Waikamoi Ridge, saw Keanae, took breaks to see waterfalls, and had a good time on our trip.  We stayed in cabins at Wainapanapa State Park.

Tom and Denise came and joined us

Although it rained a bit (we were in a rain forest), we got to hike, talk–and eat well.  John was our excellent cook  🙂

Yvonne, Elaine, Jasmine, Deanna, & John - getting ready to leave after our weekend at Wainapanapa

Flat Stanley, Barry, and I got to spend another night.   The next day we went to Hamoa Bay.

Flat Stanley and Uncle Barry checking out the waves at Hamoa

Playing on the beach at Hamoa

Playing in the waves at Hamoa

There’s windsurfing at Ho’okipa.

Doesn't this look fun?

Photo by http://www.mauiwindsurfing.net/category/hookipa/

There’s much more to do on Maui.  Hiking in Haleakala, paddling outrigger canoe, watching whales, going zip-lining . . .  What do you like to do?   Come do it here on Maui.

Flat Stanley at a Maui pool

Come visit us.

Aloha, Flat Stanley and Aunt Renée

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About reneeriley

Our blog was begun as a way to share our experiences in China. From August 2010 to July 2011, my husband, Barry Kristel, and I were at our University of Hawaii Maui College sister school, Zhejiang Agriculture and Forestry University in Lin'an, China, a city considered rural because it has only 500,000 people! We had a wonderful time. Then in February 2012, we returned to teach this time at our other sister school, Shanghai Normal University, in a city of over 21 million people. We've made many discoveries. Did you know that now Chinese girls, at least the ones who go to university, for the most part feel they are luckier than the Chinese boys? Did you know that Shanghai saved over 20,000 European Jews during WWII? Do you know how Chinese university students would deal with problems that come up in Dear Abby letters? What's it like to be on the Great Wall of China? Do you know how many Chinese girls had their feet bound and why? And we have recipes from many of the places we've visited. Among others, you can find instructions on how to fry cicadas from one of my ZAFU students and how to make chocolate-Kahlua waffles from my brother Mike in Gainesville. You can also look back to our earliest entry to see what we experienced in Oaxaca, Mexico, in 2006 during the mainly peaceful six months of protest until the Mexican government sent in the troops. Between our stays in China, Barry and I have been on the Mainland U.S. visiting family, friends and Servas hosts as we traveled home to Maui. We share those experiences too. Welcome to our blog! Aloha and Zài Jiàn, Renée and Barry

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